The Poor and the Sick

What Cholera and Ebola Have in Common

Fran Quigley
A health worker checks the temperature of a woman entering Mali from Guinea at the border in Kouremale, October 2, 2014.
A health worker checks the temperature of a woman entering Mali from Guinea at the border in Kouremale, October 2, 2014. (Joe Penney / Courtesy Reuters)
The two deadliest outbreaks of this century -- cholera and Ebola -- can be traced to one thing: poverty.
Snapshot

How To Muddle Through With Iran

Dennis Ross
A comprehensive deal is the least likely outcome to emerge from the Iranian nuclear talks before the November 24 deadline. It would be to both sides' advantage to find a way to muddle through by avoiding any formalized agreement or extension.
Snapshot

NoyNoy Stumbles

Richard Javad Heydarian
In recent months, Aquino's political fortunes have taken a dramatic turn for the worse.
Capsule Review

Today's Book: Fourth Revolution

G. John Ikenberry
The two editors of The Economist are more interested in the state’s future than in its past -- and they are worried.
Interview
Jim Yong Kim

The World Bank's president talks to Foreign Affairs about fighting inequality, his reform program, and who should succeed him.

Snapshot
Edoardo Campanella

As they struggle to save the continent’s common currency from ruin, European policymakers must also confront what could be an even bigger economic problem. Europe’s economy is on the brink of a catastrophic skills shortage.

Essay
Nicholas Burns

In the century ahead, U.S. strategic interests will align closely with those of India, and so keeping the U.S.-India relationship strong is crucial. The Obama administration needs to make Delhi a higher priority.

Newly elected United Kingdom Independence Party MP Douglas Carswell arrives at Parliament, October 13, 2014.
Snapshot
Andrew Hammond

UKIP’s by-election victory and last month's Scottish referendum may seem unrelated. But they both reflect a change in British politics: a relatively stable two-party system is giving way to more unpredictability.

Snapshot
Adam Rasmi

Most Lebanese Jews left their homeland in the twentieth century. But some Lebanese are now hoping this trend can be reversed -- and there may be cause for optimism.

Snapshot
Shashank Joshi

The fate of the Middle East, home to roughly seven million Indians, has long been tied to that of India. Despite its stake in the region, however, India has remained passive in the face of crises. It appears wary of taking on a more assertive diplomatic or military role -- more likely to evacuate citizens than to send more in to grapple with the Middle East’s problems.

Discussion