Europe's Jewish Problem

The Misunderstood Rise of European Anti-Semitism

Yascha Mounk
Riot policemen stand near a "Star of David", thrown by pro-Palestinian protesters, outside the Israeli embassy in Athens, May 31, 2010.
Riot policemen stand near a "Star of David", thrown by pro-Palestinian protesters, outside the Israeli embassy in Athens, May 31, 2010. (Yannis Behrakis / Courtesy Reuters)
Europe’s political climate is more hostile to Jews now than at any time in recent memory. Rising anti-Semitism among Europe’s Muslims, especially in the wake of the war in Gaza, is one reason for this change. But to claim that the rise of Muslim anti-Semitism is the main culprit -- as the German journalist Jochen Bittner did this week in The New York Times -- is to overlook the role played by the European majority.
Snapshot

A Rock and a Hard Place

James Yan
Few countries in Asia are in a more precarious foreign policy position than the Republic of Azerbaijan. On the western shore of the Caspian Sea, Azerbaijan lies between two larger, stronger, and unfriendly countries -- Iran and Russia -- and Azerbaijan’s pro-Western bent has done little to endear the country to either neighbor.
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Infographic: ISIS in the Crosshairs

The air strikes, how much they'll cost, and what they'll achieve.
Snapshot

Size Doesn't Matter

Fiona Hill and Jeremy Shapiro
Whether or not the Scottish independence movement succeeds, Scotland will not be Europe's last region to seek a similar deal. The protective embrace of the EU has made secession an attractive option for any place with a regional identity, ambitious politicians, and a loathing of its capital city.
Businessmen in Tokyo
Snapshot
Matt Mossman

In recent years, Occupy Wall Street hasn’t been the only group worried about how the spoils of economic growth have been distributed. Governments worldwide increasingly share the sentiment: like the pinched middle classes, they feel that corporations are taking too much of the profits for themselves. Here's the OECD and G-20's plan to get them to pay more.

A man has his temperature taken at the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport in Abuja, August 11, 2014.
Snapshot
Kim Yi Dionne

Fear of the Ebola virus and an out-of-control epidemic have made it easier for governments around the world to focus on security and military responses to public health solutions. Here's why that is a bad thing.

Snapshot
Fahad Nazer

The U.S.-Saudi relationship has suffered in recent years, with both sides harboring grievances about the other. But the fight against ISIS promises a return to better days.

Review Essay
Paul Kennedy

Lawrence Freedman’s massive, ambitious new book, Strategy, offers a personal take on an important term, one so overused that it has become almost meaningless.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during a joint news conference with Egypt's Foreign Minister, September 13, 2014.
Snapshot
Robin Simcox

There are still those in the West who regard using military force against ISIS as a mistake, believing that, with the beheadings of Western journalists, ISIS was hoping to provoke a showdown with the United States all along. Nothing could be further from the truth.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks out over Baghdad from a helicopter, September 10, 2014.
Snapshot
Michael O'Hanlon

The most important part of U.S. President Barack Obama’s recent speech about Iraq and Syria wasn’t how many air strikes the United States will conduct and when -- the elements that have dominated much of the analysis of the event. Rather, it was his call to form, from scratch, an Iraqi National Guard.

Discussion