The Syrian Marshall Plan

Why Foreign Investors Are Pouring Money Into the Country's Economy

Adam Heffez and Noam Raydan
A man holds one thousand Syrian pound banknotes, with the picture of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad.
A man holds one thousand Syrian pound banknotes, with the picture of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad. (Courtesy Reuters)
Most people who look at war-torn Syria can’t help but see the tragedy. But some are starting to treat Syria as something else entirely: an investment opportunity.
Snapshot

Band of Outsiders

Nate Schenkkan
The sanctions war between Russia and the West is hurting Russian consumers. But it is buoying the fortunes of several post-Soviet states hungry for Russian markets -- and advancing Putin's vision of a tighter Eurasian community.
Snapshot

How Détente Looks

Mohsen Milani
It is not particularly surprising that the United States is on the verge of rapprochement with Iran. What is surprising, however, is how it's coming about -- not through negotiations over the fate of Tehran’s nuclear program, but as a result of the battle against ISIS.
Snapshot

Seventy Years After Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Fumio Kishida

Next year marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings, providing leaders with a unique opportunity to move toward a nuclear-free world.

Response
Agio Pereira

Over the years, more than a few armchair critics have prognosticated the demise of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor. But the nation builders themselves can't indulge notions of failure.

Snapshot
Gregory Clark

The United States cherishes an image of itself as a country that invites in the world’s tired, its poor, and its huddled masses. In reality, the country isn't capable of transforming the life opportunities of disadvantaged populations.

A sign post in the Golan Heights, May 2, 2013.
Snapshot
Steven Simon

Despite the pandemonium in the Middle East, Sykes-Picot seems to be alive and well. That shouldn’t be surprising. Land borders settled via negotiation, especially when sealed by treaty, tend to be stable, even where relations between the neighboring states remain volatile or even hostile.

A man is doused with milk after being hit by an eye irritant from security forces trying to disperse demonstrators in Ferguson.
Snapshot
Mary L. Dudziak

As the turmoil in Ferguson unfolds, questions about the United States' commitment to human rights are once more headlining news coverage around the world. That should not be surprising. American racial inequality regularly dominated foreign news coverage during the 1950s and 1960s. And U.S. policymakers were eventually forced to respond, in part to protect the United States' image abroad.

Essay
Mary Elise Sarotte

Moscow has long argued that in expanding NATO eastward, Washington broke the promise it made to Soviet leaders shortly after the Berlin wall fell. But new evidence shows that the United States never actually made such a pledge.

Snapshot
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Reports that women have formed their own brigade within the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) have confounded experts -- and worried them. For many, the idea of women as violent extremists seems paradoxical. Why should women want to join a political struggle that so blatantly oppresses them?

Discussion