Success Stories

A Reader's Guide to Strategy

Paul Kennedy
(Julian Partridge / Flickr)
Lawrence Freedman’s massive, ambitious new book, Strategy, offers a personal take on an important term, one so overused that it has become almost meaningless.
Snapshot

Size Doesn't Matter

Fiona Hill and Jeremy Shapiro
Whether or not the Scottish independence movement succeeds, Scotland will not be Europe's last region to seek a similar deal. The protective embrace of the EU has made secession an attractive option for any place with a regional identity, ambitious politicians, and a loathing of its capital city.
Snapshot

Obama's Ebola Failure

Kim Yi Dionne
Fear of the Ebola virus and an out-of-control epidemic have made it easier for governments around the world to focus on security and military responses to public health solutions. Here's why that is a bad thing.
Capsule Review

Today's Book: Flash Boys

Richard N. Cooper
Lewis zeros in on one particularly explosive charge: the claim that major banks engage in predatory trading behavior.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during a joint news conference with Egypt's Foreign Minister, September 13, 2014.
Snapshot
Robin Simcox

There are still those in the West who regard using military force against ISIS as a mistake, believing that, with the beheadings of Western journalists, ISIS was hoping to provoke a showdown with the United States all along. Nothing could be further from the truth.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks out over Baghdad from a helicopter, September 10, 2014.
Snapshot
Michael O'Hanlon

The most important part of U.S. President Barack Obama’s recent speech about Iraq and Syria wasn’t how many air strikes the United States will conduct and when -- the elements that have dominated much of the analysis of the event. Rather, it was his call to form, from scratch, an Iraqi National Guard.

Snapshot
Carles Boix and J.C. Major

Over the past few years, the number of Catalans who wish for independence from Spain has skyrocketed. Until the early 2000s, a steady 10–15 percent supported independence. Now, according to recent opinion polls, that percentage is closer to 50 -- a symptom of deep-rooted flaws in the configuration of the Spanish state.

A riot police officer stands guard as activists in Sanaa protest U.S. drone strikes in Yemen, April 29, 2013.
Snapshot
Betcy Jose

As the reaction to the death of al Shabab leader Ahmed Abdi Godane has shown, open condemnation of targeted killings as violations of international law has slowly given way to silence. Here's why.

Somali government soldiers walk near the wreckage of a suicide car bombing in Mogadishu, September 8, 2014.
Snapshot
Paul Hidalgo

Last week’s deadly U.S. strike on Ahmed Abdi Godane, the leader of the Somalia-based Islamist militant group al Shabab, could be the group’s undoing. Even so, the region is not out of the woods.

A Kurdish fighter keeps guard against Islamic State militants near Mosul in northern Iraq, August 19, 2014.
Snapshot
William McCants

Despite ISIS’ success in capturing jihadists’ imagination, the idea of an Islamic state has one fatal flaw: its physical incarnation makes it vulnerable to attack.

Discussion