Can't Buy Me Love

China's New Rich and Its Crisis of Values

John Osburg
People pray at Yonghegong Lama Temple, the biggest Tibetan Buddhist lamasery in Beijing, February 2010.
People pray at Yonghegong Lama Temple, the biggest Tibetan Buddhist lamasery in Beijing, February 2010. (Jason Lee / Courtesy Reuters)
Will Chinese economic development ultimately lead to political development? In his new book, Age of Ambition, the journalist Evan Osnos discovers what might be the missing link: the emergence in Chinese society of a search for dignity.
Snapshot

Man Up

Ira Trivedi
In India, a sexual revolution is under way. Most often commented on are the changes it will bring for women -- an entire generation of educated women now has a say in marriage partners and life choices. But the definition of what it means to be a man in India is also changing, and one result of the turmoil is violence.
Snapshot

Band of Outsiders

Nate Schenkkan
The sanctions war between Russia and the West is hurting Russian consumers. But it is buoying the fortunes of several post-Soviet states hungry for Russian markets -- and advancing Putin's vision of a tighter Eurasian community.
Capsule Review

Today's Book: The Army and Democracy

John Waterbury
Shah is a strong advocate for civilian control of military forces, and his book explores why such control has consistently eluded Pakistan’s government.
A man takes a picture as he stands on a Soviet-style star re-touched with blue paint so that it resembles the Ukrainian flag.
Essay
John J. Mearsheimer

Conventional wisdom in the West blames the Ukraine crisis on Russian aggression. But this account is wrong: Washington and its European allies actually share most of the responsibility, having spent decades pushing east into Russia’s natural sphere of interest.

Snapshot
Mohsen Milani

It is not particularly surprising that the United States is on the verge of rapprochement with Iran. What is surprising, however, is how it's coming about -- not through negotiations over the fate of Tehran’s nuclear program, but as a result of the battle against ISIS.

Snapshot
Adam Heffez and Noam Raydan

Most people who look at war-torn Syria can’t help but see the tragedy. But some are starting to treat Syria as something else entirely: an investment opportunity.

Response
Agio Pereira

Over the years, more than a few armchair critics have prognosticated the demise of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor. But the nation builders themselves can't indulge notions of failure.

Snapshot
Gregory Clark

The United States cherishes an image of itself as a country that invites in the world’s tired, its poor, and its huddled masses. In reality, the country isn't capable of transforming the life opportunities of disadvantaged populations.

A sign post in the Golan Heights, May 2, 2013.
Snapshot
Steven Simon

Despite the pandemonium in the Middle East, Sykes-Picot seems to be alive and well. That shouldn’t be surprising. Land borders settled via negotiation, especially when sealed by treaty, tend to be stable, even where relations between the neighboring states remain volatile or even hostile.

Discussion