Delhi Dilemma

India Is Now the Biggest Barrier to a Global Climate Treaty

Scott Moore
A chimney is reflected in a puddle polluted with chemicals at an industrial area of the western Indian city of Surat, November 25, 2009.
A chimney is reflected in a puddle polluted with chemicals at an industrial area of the western Indian city of Surat, November 25, 2009. (Arko Datta / Courtesy Reuters)
China and the United States were once the greatest barriers to a comprehensive global climate agreement. No longer: India is now the last stumbling block standing in the way. It's still possible, however, to get New Delhi on board. Washington just needs to offer the right incentives.
Postscript

Executive Disorder

Lauren Carasik
Obama's executive order will provide much needed humanitarian relief to some law-abiding undocumented immigrants. But it will do nothing for the unaccompanied minors and families whose desperate flight to the United States last summer may have finally pushed the White House to act.
Snapshot

Stopgap Democracy

Jed Ober
Afghanistan's new unity government is not a step forward in the country's political development. Without deeper reforms, the temporary measure will only worsen the country's democratic malaise.
Capsule Review

Today's Book: Property and Political Order

Nicolas van de Walle
In her ambitious new book, Boone argues that struggles over land are now the defining characteristic of African politics and have an impact on all other political institutions and every interaction between citizens and states.
Demonstrators in front of the White House, November 6, 2014.
Postscript
Marvin Ammori

Last week, Obama finally stepped up to the plate, releasing a video and a detailed plan calling on the FCC to adopt the “the strongest possible rules to protect net neutrality.” It was the most accurate, well-informed, and important statement ever issued by a public official on the topic of Internet freedom.

Flags near the UN.
Snapshot
Rebecca M. Aragon and Jean M. Flannery

Foreign sovereign employers often assume that they are immune from U.S. court jurisdiction. That isn't exactly true, and believing it could be a costly mistake.

AMISOM soldiers patrol near stockpiles of charcoal close to the Kismayo sea port, February 27, 2013.
Snapshot
Tom Keatinge

To take out al Shabab, one need look no further than charcoal. The United Nations has repeatedly called for countries in the region to disrupt the group’s trade in this environmentally destructive product, but, as the most recent Somalia UN Monitoring Group report revealed, such efforts have been lackluster. With its patience wearing thin, the UN has now taken matters into its own hands by approving a naval intervention.

Snapshot
Hussein Kalout

The conflict in Syria has divided Lebanon into two distinct camps, with tensions between them worsening by the day. If both sides fail to compromise, the country will again be plunged into civil war.

The two sides are at such odds that it will be impossible in the short term to solve the country's crisis. But its most damaging effects can be mitigated by reminding all parties of the many advantages of Lebanon's traditional consensus-based style of politics.

An Apple store in Pudong, the financial district of Shanghai, February 29, 2012.
Snapshot
Jonathan Woetzel and Jeongmin Seong

With 632 million Internet users, China has already become the world’s largest e-tailing market, with almost $300 billion in sales posted in 2013. Although digital marketplaces have changed the face of Chinese retail, however, other major sectors such as manufacturing and healthcare have been much slower to embrace the Internet. China’s digital transformation is just beginning, which means that over the next few years, the world’s second-largest economy will radically transform the way it does business.

An onlooker waves a Russian flag during a military parade in Belgrade to mark 70 years since the city's liberation by Russia.
Snapshot
Alexander J. Motyl

As the West searches for an adequate policy response to Putin’s ongoing aggression in Ukraine, Western policymakers would do well to reread George F. Kennan’s famous “X” article, published in the July 1947 issue of Foreign Affairs. Compelling then, Kennan’s case for containing Russia makes just as much sense now.

Discussion