The American Dream Is an Illusion

Immigration and Inequality

Gregory Clark
An entrance sign written in Spanish is seen along the U.S.-Mexico border fence near Brownsville, Texas on August 4, 2014.
An entrance sign written in Spanish is seen along the U.S.-Mexico border fence near Brownsville, Texas on August 4, 2014. (Courtesy Reuters)
The United States cherishes the image of itself as a country that invites in the world’s tired, its poor, and its huddled masses. In reality, the country isn't capable of transforming the life opportunities of disadvantaged populations.
Snapshot

Built to Last

Steven Simon
Despite the pandemonium in the Middle East, Sykes-Picot seems to be alive and well. That shouldn’t be surprising. Land borders settled via negotiation, especially when sealed by treaty, tend to be stable, even where relations between the neighboring states remain volatile or even hostile.
Response

Timor-Leste Success

Agio Pereira
Over the years, more than a few armchair critics have prognosticated the demise of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor. But the nation builders themselves can't indulge notions of failure.
Audio/Video

Video: Vajpeyi on Hindu Nationalism

Justin Vogt and Ananya Vajpeyi
Deputy Managing Editor Justin Vogt discusses the rise of Hindu nationalism with Ananya Vajpeyi, a fellow at the Center for Developing Societies in New Delhi.
A man is doused with milk after being hit by an eye irritant from security forces trying to disperse demonstrators in Ferguson.
Snapshot
Mary L. Dudziak

As the turmoil in Ferguson unfolds, questions about the United States' commitment to human rights are once more headlining news coverage around the world. That should not be surprising. American racial inequality regularly dominated foreign news coverage during the 1950s and 1960s. And U.S. policymakers were eventually forced to respond, in part to protect the United States' image abroad.

Snapshot
Tarek Osman

As Arab governments become increasingly authoritarian, the region's middle classes will confront a choice: cast their lot with the ruling elites or stand up to the government and risk their social and economic standing. 

Essay
Mary Elise Sarotte

Moscow has long argued that in expanding NATO eastward, Washington broke the promise it made to Soviet leaders shortly after the Berlin wall fell. But new evidence shows that the United States never actually made such a pledge.

Snapshot
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Reports that women have formed their own brigade within the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) have confounded experts -- and worried them. For many, the idea of women as violent extremists seems paradoxical. Why should women want to join a political struggle that so blatantly oppresses them?

Comment
Francis Fukuyama

The problems with American politics today stem from the basic design of U.S. political institutions, exacerbated by increasingly hostile polarization. Unfortunately, absent some sort of major external shock, the decay is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

Snapshot
Arthur Herman

Compared with the most sophisticated weapons systems in use today, tunnels have withstood the test of time. There’s no way to know how long drones or lasers or anti-missile defense systems will last, but as long as there is warfare, tunnels will almost certainly be part of the fight.

Discussion