Adam Segal

Video

Editor Gideon Rose recently joined China experts Elizabeth Economy and Adam Segal to discuss "the Chinese dream at home and abroad."

Reading List
Adam Segal

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on cybersecurity.

Comment
Mar/Apr
2012
Adam Segal

Chinese cyberattacks are stealing priceless intellectual property and crucial military secrets from companies and governments around the globe. Negotiations with Beijing are unlikely to help, since China has little interest in cracking down on hacking. So Washington must focus on defenses, not diplomacy.

Capsule Review
May/June
2011
Andrew J. Nathan

Segal thinks the United States can maintain its dominance by innovating faster than technology leaks out.

Essay
Nov/Dec
2010
Michael Levi, Elizabeth C. Economy, Shannon K. O'Neil, and Adam Segal

Clean-energy technology is expensive and the United States is spending far too little on developing it. The U.S. government must do more to promote cross-border innovation and protect intellectual property rights.

Snapshot
Adam Segal

In a bid to end its dependence on foreign intellectual property and become a global power in science and technology, China is attempting to foster indigenous innovation. Are the U.S. government and business community right to be worried about threats to free trade and intellectual property rights?

Essay
May/June
2009
Elizabeth C. Economy and Adam Segal

A heightened bilateral relationship may not be possible for China and the United States, as the two countries have mismatched interests and values. Washington should embrace a more flexible and multilateral approach.

Postscript
Rawi Abdelal and Adam Segal

The international financial crisis has thrown the forward march of globalization into question. If the United States and others can learn from the crisis and control borrowing, then the positive potential of global trade and finance may be restored.

Essay
Jul/Aug
2008
Elizabeth C. Economy and Adam Segal

Failure to plan for predictable problems has turned China's coming-out party into an embarrassment.

Essay
Jan/Feb
2007
Rawi Abdelal and Adam Segal

Not long ago, the expansion of free trade worldwide seemed inevitable. Over the last few years, however, economic barriers have started to rise once more. The forecast for the future looks mixed: some integration will probably continue even as a new economic nationalism takes hold. Managing this new, muddled world will take deft handling, in Washington, Brussels, and Beijing.

Comment
Nov/Dec
2004
Adam Segal

For 50 years, the United States has maintained its economic edge by being better and faster than any other country at inventing and exploiting new technologies. Today, however, its dominance is starting to slip, as Asian countries pour resources into R&D and challenge America's traditional role in the global economy.