Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr.

Audio
Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr. and Gideon Rose

Andrew Krepinevich discusses the future of U.S. defense spending with Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose.

Essay
Nov/Dec
2012
Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr.

As Western defense budgets are declining, the price of projecting power is increasing and the range of interests requiring protection is expanding. To square this circle, the Pentagon needs to embrace a dramatic shift in its strategy. It should turn its focus away from repelling traditional cross-border invasions and pursuing regime change followed by stability operations -- and concentrate instead on assuring access to key regions and the global commons.

Snapshot
Eric S. Edelman, Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr., and Evan Braden Montgomery

According to the recent IAEA report, Iran is closer to having nuclear weapons that was widely assumed. Once it does goes nuclear, Tehran will be almost impossible to stop. To prevent it, the Obama administration must use military force--and soon.

Essay
Jan/Feb
2011
Eric S. Edelman, Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr, and Evan Braden Montgomery

Iran's acquisition of a nuclear bomb would upend the Middle East. It is unclear how a nuclear-armed Iran would weigh the costs, benefits, and risks of brinkmanship, meaning that it could be difficult to deter Tehran from attacking the United States' interests or partners in the region.

Response
Nov/Dec
2009
Thomas Donnelly, Philip Dur, and Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr.

Andrew Krepinevich's vision for the U.S. military underestimates Washington's existing commitments and capabilities, Thomas Donnelly and Philip Dur argue. Not so, replies Krepinevich, and now is no time to stay the course.

Essay
Jul/Aug
2009
Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr.

The military foundations of U.S. dominance are eroding. In response, Washington should pursue new sources of military advantage and a more modest grand strategy.

Essay
Sep/Oct
2005
Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr.

Because they lack a coherent strategy, U.S. forces in Iraq have failed to defeat the insurgency or improve security. Winning will require a new approach to counterinsurgency, one that focuses on providing security to Iraqis rather than hunting down insurgents. And it will take at least a decade.

Capsule Review
Jul/Aug
1996
Andrew F. Krepinevich, Jr.