Andrew J. Nathan

Capsule Review
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

Smith explores several ways in which growing Chinese power has undercut Japanese public support for conciliatory policies toward Beijing.

Capsule Review
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

This book shines a light on one of the most obscure corners of Asia: the region of mountains and jungles in northeastern India that is surrounded by Bangladesh, Tibet, and Myanmar.

Capsule Review
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

Why do poor voters sometimes back parties whose policies mostly serve the interests of elites? Thachil tackles this question by studying the electoral strategies of the upper-caste-based BJP party in India.

Capsule Review
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

This quarterly online publication of the Hoover Institution tracks the latest developments in Chinese policy, including diplomacy, military affairs, economics, Communist Party politics, and events in the provinces.

Capsule Review
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

Gregg's service as U.S. ambassador to South Korea in 1989–93 culminated a distinguished 42-year career in Asia. In this book, he recounts his experiences with insight and humor.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

The emergence of a large middle class in China has produced a demand for more citizen participation.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

The power shift between the United States and China is often misunderstood as a two-player drama. This book draws attention to the 20 or so “middle powers” that have as much to gain or lose as the two main actors.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

Twenty-two militarily crucial straits and channels constrain the ability of the Chinese navy to project its power into the wider Pacific.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

In Cambodia, democracy is a mirage; so are constitutionalism, civil society, the rule of law, transitional justice, poverty reduction, media freedom, and environmental conservation.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

China’s outreach to the tens of millions of ethnic Chinese living abroad—the world’s largest diaspora—is an often overlooked part of the country’s soft-power strategy, but it is as careful and well organized as the other parts. 

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

Given India’s deep divisions along caste, class, regional, and religious lines, the stability of the country’s democracy is puzzling.

Capsule Review
Andrew J. Nathan

Hayton, a journalist based in the United Kingdom, argues that even with China’s military buildup, China’s navy is technologically 20 years behind its U.S. counterpart.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

This innovative book argues that historically, the untouchables (or Dalits) were excluded less as a result of religious beliefs than on account of their economic role as bonded agricultural laborers.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

This study of Indonesia’s most successful entrepreneur, who died in 2012 at the age of 95, is a contribution to both business history and political history.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Andrew J. Nathan

China aims not to simply defend its core interests, nor to merely match the power of the United States, but rather to achieve global economic, cultural, and military dominance.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

The Nepalese Maoist movement emerged at an unlikely time: the mid-1990s, when communism was in global retreat. But by 2006, the movement had gained control over most of Nepal’s countryside. This book reveals how this happened.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

Economy and Levi’s findings thread a path between alarmist and complacent views of China’s impact on the global economy.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

Nulo uses the “convention of childish innocence” to explore forbidden issues in Tibetan history, including the cruelty of the Chinese invasion but also that of the preinvasion Tibetan order.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

Hillman has deciphered “the unwritten rules of Chinese officialdom” over the course of ten years of fieldwork in southwestern China. His insights apply to local governments throughout the country and to higher levels of politics, as well

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

According to the contributors to this volume, the Thai monarchy is not a rock of stability, as royalist orthodoxy would have it, but rather the root of Thailand’s troubles. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

These two books ponder the changes taking place in the strategic environment of Asia and come to similar conclusions about how the United States should respond to them. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

Pyongyang is well on the way to mastering the technologies it needs to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. But the contributors to this volume argue convincingly that little will change when North Korea crosses that threshold.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

The Chinese middle class has not pushed for democracy because it depends on the state-dominated economy for its prosperity, it is relatively satisfied with the state’s provision of urban services, and it fears the disruptive potential of the lower classes, which still form a large majority. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

The short-lived Japanese empire (1895–1945) espoused a confused and contested ideology. One of its strands was assimilationist; the other, racist.