Andrew Moravcsik

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

This book documents public attitudes and official policies toward Europe’s largest and most consistently shunned indigenous minority: Gypsies, or Roma.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

One of the major developments of the last decade is that ordinary Europeans now pay more attention to what happens in Brussels and often respond negatively.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

How well does the EU promote multilateral action to solve global problems?

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

These two books are the best on the euro crisis to have appeared in recent years.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

When François Mitterrand was president of France, from 1981 until 1995, the most common adjective used to describe him was “Machiavellian.”

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

Engberg’s analysis challenges the conventional wisdom about European defense policy.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

This understated yet engaging book provides the best modern account of why, alone among all Nazi-occupied peoples, the Danes mobilized effective organized resistance to the Holocaust.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

In this book, Giddens seeks to renew the commitment of the British left to social democratic ideals and to European cooperation.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

Although its subject matter and the text itself are a bit dry, this book is the best so far on the Irish financial crisis of 2008.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

This latest edition of van Schendelen’s classic work synthesizes the most important lessons that political scientists, management scholars, and public affairs professionals have learned about how to lobby the European Union.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

In this book, a team of sociologists revisits some of the most horrifying cases of mass slaughter from the past century.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

Linos argues that the adoption of particular health and family policies in one country can increase support for them in others.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

 In recent months, spies and surveillance have dominated headlines all across Europe. These two books help illuminate how contemporary espionage took shape.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

In this volume, experts grapple with one of the great mysteries of modern economic history: Italy’s erratic growth.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

Steinberg argues that the recent focus of Islamist terrorists on U.S. and European targets -- rather than, say, Saudi Arabian and Egyptian ones -- is a response to Western overreaction to 9/11.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

By personalizing European politics, both of these books obscure the real policy tradeoffs that Germany and the other EU countries face today. The polarization the two books illustrate is itself one of the main challenges Merkel faces in realizing any vision for Europe’s future.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

Van Middelaar suggests that diplomats, lawyers, bureaucrats, and politicians deepen their cooperation across borders and impose centralized democratic practices on Europe from the top down.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

Eschewing overly technical analysis, this group of authors recognizes that the causes of Greece’s dilemmas and the future trajectory of Greek reform rest above all on domestic politics.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

French farmers prevailed in persuading their government to oppose the use of genetically modified organisms by linking their cause to powerful legitimating symbols and political values in France.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

This is one of the first books that addresses the deeper political significance of the euro crisis.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

In recent decades, archaeologists, geneticists, and other scholars have revolutionized the study of prehistoric Europe.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

Engaging and informative from start to finish, the first part of Moore’s two-volume biography of Margaret Thatcher recounts and transcends well-known themes and anecdotes about the small-town grocer’s daughter who rose to become prime minister of the United Kingdom.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

Nesi chronicles the sad story of free trade’s impact on “his people” in the town of Prato, capturing the distinctive pain of a modern European left behind, a cultural stranger in his own land.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Andrew Moravcsik

In this mammoth biography, destined to become the standard work on Kohl for some time to come, Schwarz portrays him as shrewd in politics but a bit naive on substantive matters.