C. Christine Fair

Snapshot
C. Christine Fair

There is very little that Pakistan's prime minister could do now to contain the damage that the army and its two marionettes -- Qadri and Khan -- have already inflicted with massive protests.

Snapshot
C. Christine Fair

This week, the Pakistani government is set to dissolve the National Assembly and call for new elections. The outgoing administration made more progress toward institutionalizing democracy than many expected. Even so, the army is not ready to go quietly and is crafting its own plans for the country's future.

Snapshot
C. Christine Fair

Renewed efforts to work with Pakistan's people and politicians -- through professional exchanges, training programs, and increased trade -- will eventually bear fruit, stabilizing the country and empowering civilians to exert control over security and foreign policy.

Snapshot
Graeme Blair, C. Christine Fair, Neil Malhotra, Jacob N. Shapiro

Policymakers have converged on economic development as a key to ending terrorism, in the belief that poorer people are more susceptible to the appeals of violent groups. In fact, in Pakistan, the poor are less supportive of militant groups than the middle class.

Roundtable
Stephen P. Cohen, C. Christine Fair, Sumit Ganguly, Shaun Gregory, Aqil Shah, and Ashley J. Tellis

A Foreign Affairs roundtable discussion on the causes of instability in Pakistan and what, if anything, can be done about them.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Lawrence D. Freedman

This is a fascinating collection of case studies of instances in which regular forces have found themselves trying to cope with armed groups that have occupied holy places, mainly mosques (in Iraq, Islamabad, Kashmir, Mecca, and Thailand) but also one church (in Bethlehem) and a temple (in Amritsar, India).