Daniel W. Drezner

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

Many believe that the financial crisis of 2008 represented a failure of the international economic system. Drezner argues the contrary: although the system did not prevent the crisis or the subsequent recession, it did avoid a catastrophe on the order of the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Essay
Jan/Feb
2013
Daniel W. Drezner

Republicans need to start taking foreign policy more seriously, thinking hard about the thorny task of managing a superpower and not leaving it as a plaything for right-wing interest groups. Failure to do so quickly could be catastrophic, ceding this ground to Democrats for the a generation at least.

Video
Jonathan Tepperman, Daniel W. Drezner, and Rachel Kleinfeld

On the evening of the final U.S. presidential debate, Foreign Affairs Managing Editor Jonathan Tepperman moderated a bipartisan panel discussion on the foreign policy issues facing the candidates.

Essay
Jul/Aug
2011
Daniel W. Drezner

In uncertain times, grand strategies are important because they help others interpret a country's behavior. Despite some missteps, the Obama administration has in fact developed such a strategy, and a good one. But it has done a terrible job explaining it, which defeats the whole purpose of the exercise.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2009
G. John Ikenberry

This small gem of a book brings together academic experts and government veterans to reflect on how the United States, in the words of Secretary of State Dean Acheson, should "look ahead . . . to see the emerging form of things to come and outline what should be done to meet or anticipate them."

Reading List
Daniel W. Drezner

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on economic sanctions.

Essay
Mar/Apr
2007
Daniel W. Drezner

Controversies over the war in Iraq and U.S. unilateralism have overshadowed a more pragmatic and multilateral component of the Bush administration's grand strategy: its attempt to reconfigure U.S. foreign policy and international institutions in order to account for shifts in the global distribution of power and the emergence of states such as China and India. This unheralded move is well intentioned and well advised, and Washington should redouble its efforts.

Essay
May/Jun
2004
Daniel W. Drezner

According to the election-year bluster of politicians and pundits, the outsourcing of American jobs to other countries has become a problem of epic proportion. Fortunately, this alarmism is misguided. Outsourcing actually brings far more benefits than costs, both now and in the long run. If its critics succeed in provoking a new wave of American protectionism, the consequences will be disastrous -- for the U.S. economy and for the American workers they claim to defend.