G. John Ikenberry

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

These two recent books offer competing but complementary visions of the past, present, and future of government.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

The effort to project Western liberal ideas onto the international system has been marked by tensions, dilemmas, tradeoffs, and contradictions.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

As the idea of global governance takes root, governments increasingly take pains to be seen as following the law -- a development that has greatly increased the power of international courts and judges.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Reich and Lebow have joined a long list of writers who have announced the end of U.S. hegemony and the coming of the next world order.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Glanville shows that the idea that sovereign states should enjoy the absolute right of autonomous self-government and nonintervention was not present at the creation of the Westphalian system.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

In this lively little book, Kenny argues that the United States should embrace, not resist, a world in which “the rest” catch up with the West.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This is the most original and thought-provoking forecast of the future of world politics to be published in recent years.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

In Held and Roger’s view, the world faces a growing “governance gap.”

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

In sweeping narratives, Iriye and his collaborators highlight the profound ways in which transnational forces -- trade, investment, immigration, and so on -- have transformed human consciousness.

Essay
May/June
2014
G. John Ikenberry

China, Iran, and Russia are not determined to undo the post–Cold War settlement. They are not full-scale revisionist powers but, at most, part-time spoilers. The United States is far more powerful and has built a robust liberal world order countries need to integrate with in order to succeed.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Reus-Smit argues that most accounts of the rise of nation-states fail to explain why people wanted independent statehood in the first place. His answer is human rights.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
G. John Ikenberry

With this volume, Michael Mann, a renowned historical sociologist, completes his magisterial survey of power and society across human history.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Mazlish captures the changing ways that Western societies have understood the self and visualized the world as they moved from medieval to modern life.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Over the decades, states and organizations have established a large body of international human rights law. But does it really influence the way governments behave?

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This book represents one of the best efforts yet to understand why interstate wars emerge, persist, and, most important, end.

Capsule Review
G. John Ikenberry

In recent years, Katzenstein, a renowned scholar of international relations, has advanced a strikingly new vision of civilizations, contending that although civilizations exist and are important, they are not really actors. Rather, they are loose, pluralistic systems of belief and identity.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Barber sees cities as the best hope for solving global problems and safeguarding democracy.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Miller, who recently served as the U.S. National Security Council’s director for Afghanistan and Pakistan, assesses efforts to rebuild failed states through armed intervention.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This useful collection examines what happened when intellectuals in one country grappled with the ideas of another.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

In seeking to prevent violence, liberal interventionists are creating new legal and moral justifications for the use of force around the world.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Chellaney sketches a bleak picture of water scarcity in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East and speculates whether the social and environmental stresses of water shortage could lead to conflict and armed violence.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

In this book Collier explores the economics and politics of global migration and offers a surprising and controversial case for restricting it.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

This book provides a useful contribution to debates about democracy promotion by looking at what Kurki deems the “hidden” assumptions about political change that inform discussions of the topic.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Hafner-Burton’s sober message is that human rights promotion cannot be separated from the daunting task of building stable, rule-based societies.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

For thousands of years, people have been launching themselves onto water to fish, trade, fight, and explore -- and doing so in ways that have profoundly shaped human institutions and the rise and decline of civilizations.