G. John Ikenberry

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Reus-Smit argues that most accounts of the rise of nation-states fail to explain why people wanted independent statehood in the first place. His answer is human rights.

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

With this volume, Michael Mann, a renowned historical sociologist, completes his magisterial survey of power and society across human history.

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Mazlish captures the changing ways that Western societies have understood the self and visualized the world as they moved from medieval to modern life.

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Over the decades, states and organizations have established a large body of international human rights law. But does it really influence the way governments behave?

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This book represents one of the best efforts yet to understand why interstate wars emerge, persist, and, most important, end.

Capsule Review
G. John Ikenberry

In recent years, Katzenstein, a renowned scholar of international relations, has advanced a strikingly new vision of civilizations, contending that although civilizations exist and are important, they are not really actors. Rather, they are loose, pluralistic systems of belief and identity.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Barber sees cities as the best hope for solving global problems and safeguarding democracy.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Miller, who recently served as the U.S. National Security Council’s director for Afghanistan and Pakistan, assesses efforts to rebuild failed states through armed intervention.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This useful collection examines what happened when intellectuals in one country grappled with the ideas of another.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
G. John Ikenberry

In seeking to prevent violence, liberal interventionists are creating new legal and moral justifications for the use of force around the world.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Chellaney sketches a bleak picture of water scarcity in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East and speculates whether the social and environmental stresses of water shortage could lead to conflict and armed violence.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

In this book Collier explores the economics and politics of global migration and offers a surprising and controversial case for restricting it.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

This book provides a useful contribution to debates about democracy promotion by looking at what Kurki deems the “hidden” assumptions about political change that inform discussions of the topic.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Hafner-Burton’s sober message is that human rights promotion cannot be separated from the daunting task of building stable, rule-based societies.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
G. John Ikenberry

For thousands of years, people have been launching themselves onto water to fish, trade, fight, and explore -- and doing so in ways that have profoundly shaped human institutions and the rise and decline of civilizations.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Wimmer’s major contribution is to demonstrate how the spread of the nation-state generated violence and war.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
G. John Ikenberry

This iconoclastic book takes issue with the conventional view that global security requires strong states capable of policing borders and enforcing order.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Hall notes that there are limits to how diverse a stable and well-functioning society can be: some minimal agreement must exist over certain essentials, such as respect for the rule of law and an abhorrence of violence.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Unlike earlier periods when democracies faltered, such as the 1930s, today democracy is waning in every region of the world, and many countries where democratic rule is fading are regional powers, such as Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia, which harms the prospects for democracy in surrounding countries.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Rosecrance urges the United States to pursue a grand strategy of trade and economic integration, this time focused on the creation of a massive economic union with Europe.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
G. John Ikenberry

For over half a century, Germany and Japan have struggled to put World War II behind them. Berger has produced one of the most sophisticated and sensitive treatments yet about how these two countries have contended with their troubled histories.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
G. John Ikenberry

In recent years, Katzenstein, a renowned scholar of international relations, has advanced a strikingly new vision of civilizations, contending that although civilizations exist and are important, they are not really actors. Rather, they are loose, pluralistic systems of belief and identity.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Choucri has put together a systematic guide to cyberspace issues, informed by international relations theory.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
G. John Ikenberry

In this short but persuasive book, Goldin argues that the institutions of postwar global governance—the UN, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank—are increasingly incapable of managing the instabilities created by global interdependence.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
G. John Ikenberry

Here, a team of American and European scholars makes one of the best efforts yet to identify the norms of hegemonic and great-power responsibility by examining three “problem areas” in contemporary world politics: nonproliferation, climate change, and international financial regulation.