Jacob N. Shapiro

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Lawrence D. Freedman

Terrorist organizations are no different from other political entities, except that their resources tend to be as meager as their ambitions are huge

Snapshot
Jacob N. Shapiro

When al Qaeda's latest plot was disrupted because Ayman al-Zawahiri initiated a mundane conference call, it only hardened his reputation as an ineffective and intrusive micro-manager. But Zawahiri's critics have it wrong -- red tape can be a terrorist mastermind's best friend.

Snapshot
Graeme Blair, C. Christine Fair, Neil Malhotra, Jacob N. Shapiro

Policymakers have converged on economic development as a key to ending terrorism, in the belief that poorer people are more susceptible to the appeals of violent groups. In fact, in Pakistan, the poor are less supportive of militant groups than the middle class.

Snapshot
Eli Berman, Joseph H. Felter, and Jacob N. Shapiro

The United States' current approach to counterinsurgency centers on protecting the population, with a special emphasis on political and economic development. But does that development-based strategy work? In a study using data on reconstruction spending and violence in Iraq, the provision of certain government services does lead to a reduction in violence.