Jacques E. C. Hymans

Snapshot
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Many have warned that even if a Iran accepts a nuclear deal, it will continue to develop nuclear weapons in secret. In reality, however, Iran simply doesn't have the capability to build the bomb without getting caught.

Snapshot
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Nuclear weapons programs are hard to dismantle for bureaucratic reasons, not technical ones. If the United States hopes for its recent agreement with Iran to stick, it must win over the scientists and pencil pushers who keep Iran's nuclear program running.

Postscript
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Last month, Israel's intelligence agency once again quietly indicated that it had downgraded its assessments of Iran's ability to build a nuclear bomb. It is time for Israel and the West to cut down on their alarmism. Crying wolf too early and too often can destroy a government's credibility and leave it vulnerable.

Letter to the Editor
Nov/Dec
2012
Dustin Dehez; Jacques E. C. Hymans
Snapshot
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Institutional dysfunction will slow or halt Pyongyang's further progress toward an operational nuclear arsenal. The same is true for the remaining would-be proliferators, all of which suffer from a lack of professionalism and poorly-built political systems.

Essay
May/June
2012
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Nuclear weapons are hard to build for managerial reasons, not technical ones. This is why so few authoritarian regimes have succeeded: they don’t have the right culture or institutions. When it comes to Iran’s program, then, the United States and its allies should get out of the way and let Iran’s worst enemies -- its own leaders -- gum up the process on their own.