Joshua Stacher

Snapshot
Joshua Stacher

Anyone who claims to possess full political power in post-Mubarak Egypt is lying. That even goes for Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the military’s commander in chief and Egypt’s current defense minister, whose impending presidential candidacy reveals the military's weakness more than strength.

Snapshot
Joshua Stacher

Egypt is unsettled but not on the verge of another revolution. Certainly, the country's unreformed security services have been cause for ongoing protest. But they will also ensure that those riots don't get out of hand.

Snapshot
Joshua Stacher

In recent months, the Egyptian military has struck a quiet alliance with the country's president, believing that he and the Muslim Brotherhood will keep winning elections. In return for their support, the generals got a draft constitution that protected the many of their core interests. Yet the military also preserved its appearance of neutrality -- leaving it room to change horses should the Brotherhood fall behind.

Snapshot
Joshua Stacher

By playing the role of both arsonist and firefighter, the Egyptian government has forced protesters fleeing the regime to seek refuge with the regime. In so doing, has the government ensured its survival?

This article appears in the Foreign Affairs/CFR eBook, The New Arab Revolt.