Juan de Onis

Letter From
Juan de Onis

The upcoming presidential election in Chile will test whether the country's middle-class majority will continue to support a government that has brought economic benefits through a dynamic free market and private enterprise system, or will instead turn to a more socialist and populist program.

Snapshot
Juan de Onis

In February, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff announced that she would seek a second term in office. Given the country's poor economic performance, the coming election season will not be an easy one for her.

Snapshot
Juan de Onis

In February, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff announced that she would seek a second term in office. Given the country's poor economic performance, the coming election season will not be an easy one for her.

Snapshot
Juan de Onis

In November, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's closest adviser was sentenced to ten years in jail for corruption. Now, the highest court seems determined to go after Lula himself. Whatever the final result, the judges' campaign has convinced Brazil's taxpaying middle class that it is time to stop tolerating graft.

Essay
Nov/Dec
2008
Juan de Onis

Brazil is on the cusp of fulfilling its potential as a global player. The next U.S. president should rethink relations with this important country.

Essay
May/Jun
2000
Juan de Onis

Under President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Brazil has finally embraced modern capitalism and broken decisively with a sclerotic old economic model. The country's ambitious reforms are encouraging private investment and loosening state control. Even the 1999 currency crisis eventually ended smoothly. But the world should hold its applause until Cardoso can prove that his reforms will last. If not, his efforts will merely join Brazil's dreary list of false starts and missteps.

Essay
Fall
1989
Juan de Onis

As in other Latin American countries that have returned to democracy this decade after bitter experiences under military regimes, Brazil's "New Republic" came to power with wide public support. The 1985 transfer of power from the military to the politicians went smoothly. The political and labor climate was relatively calm. The productive base of the economy was solid and business sectors wanted to give democracy a chance. Brazil had a foreign debt of over $100 billion, but huge trade surpluses made foreign creditors willing to refinance the debt. Under these circumstances the transition did not have to go badly. But it has.