Lawrence J. Korb

Response
Mar/Apr
2013
J. Thomas Moriarty; Daniel Katz; Lawrence J. Korb; Jonathan Caverley and Ethan B. Kapstein

Jonathan Caverly and Ethan Kapstein maintained that the United States’ domination of the global arms market is disappearing and that as a consequence, Washington is squandering an array of economic and political benefits. Critics dispute the point; Caverley and Kapstein respond.

Snapshot
Lawrence J. Korb

Defense budget cuts won't make the United States less secure. The problem is simpler: the Pentagon does not have a resource problem, it has an administrative problem.

Response
Sep/Oct
2007
Richard B. Myers and Richard H. Kohn, Mackubin Thomas Owens, Lawrence J. Korb, and Michael C. Desch

Did the Bush administration disregard military expertise before the Iraq war? Should military leaders have done more to protest in response?

Response
Nov/Dec
2006
Lawrence J. Korb, Peter Ogden, and Frederick W. Kagan

The U.S. military needs more manpower, badly. And this means reordering budgets, putting troops over technology. Or does it?

Comment
Mar/Apr
2004
Lawrence J. Korb

The battlefield victory in Iraq obscured what the occupation has since made clear: the U.S. military's personnel system--especially the size of its active-duty Army and the number of crucial units kept in the reserves--desperately needs updating.

Essay
Nov/Dec
1995
Lawrence J. Korb

President Clinton and the Republican Congress do not agree on much, but both want to give the Pentagon more than it dared hope for in the post--Cold War era: some $260 billion a year. The Joint Chiefs say the United States should be ready to fight two wars at once, but would this really take as many troops as they claim, and is it even reasonable to plan for it? Look around at what allies and enemies are spending. Election time, however, is almost here, and politics in the defense debate has seldom run higher. What makes no strategic sense is good on the hustings.