Minxin Pei

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Minxin Pei

One of the most vexing questions for scholars of China is whether Chinese political culture inherently supports authoritarian rule. 

Review Essay
Mar/Apr
2014
Minxin Pei

As the United States and China try to keep their relationship from exploding, one might think that leading technocratic experts in both countries would be a force for calm rather than conflict. A new collection of essays dispels any such hope.

Reading List
Minxin Pei

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on Chinese politics.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2012
Minxin Pei

This book puts forward a novel theory of social protest in a transitional authoritarian regime. Chen seems to suggest, provocatively, that low-intensity social conflict may function like a pressure valve mitigating more lethal systemic risks -- an argument sure to stimulate more debate and research.

Capsule Review
Sep/Oct
2009
Minxin Pei

How East Asians View Democracy, a collaboration of leading American and East Asian scholars of democracy and public opinion, is a pioneering effort that relies on standardized survey methods to measure East Asians' support for democracy.

Snapshot
Minxin Pei

The financial crisis is challenging Beijing's ability to hold up its end of the deal with the country's elite, leading to a potential threat to the continued rule of the Chinese Communist Party.

Review Essay
Jul/Aug
2006
Andrew J. Nathan

In China's Trapped Transition, Minxin Pei attempts to solve the puzzle of China's present -- and figure out its future.

Essay
Sep/Oct
2002
Minxin Pei

Predicting the outcome of China's upcoming leadership succession has become a popular parlor game in certain Washington circles. But a focus on power plays in Beijing misses the real story: China is facing a hidden crisis of governance. Whoever they are, the new leaders will have to deal with a failing state, an ailing party apparatus, and rising social tensions if they wish to sustain China's economic growth.

Essay
Jan/Feb
1998
Minxin Pei

Critics of the Clinton administration's engagement policy toward China are largely unaware of the last two decades' profound political changes in the Middle Kingdom. Deng Xiaoping received his due for his economic reforms, but not for the kinder, gentler politics that helped reduce elite backstabbing, broaden the backgrounds and outlook of government officials, strengthen the legislature, and improve the legal system. But even if the pace picks up, Washington should not expect a rapid expansion of democratic participation.