Nicholas D. Kristof

Review Essay
Jan/Feb
2010
Isobel Coleman

Efforts to provide the world's women with economic and political power are more than just a worthy moral crusade: they represent perhaps the best strategy for pursuing development and stability across the globe.

Review Essay
Nov/Dec
2000
Walter Russell Mead

Thunder From the East incisively captures Asia's current dynamism and diversity. But what does the word "Asia" mean today? And what will it mean tomorrow?

Essay
Nov/Dec
1998
Nicholas D. Kristof

As economic crisis plunges Asia into chaos, old wounds may reopen. The continent still fears Japan, thanks to its World War II brutalities. By refusing to apologize, Tokyo only makes matters worse. A power vacuum results: an unrepentant Japan will never be allowed to lead a suspicious Asia. Instead, flash points may ignite, and East Asia and even America could be dragged into a war. To defuse tensions, America must push its ally to show remorse and Japan must pay its World War II debts. In turn, China and Korea -- age-old enemies of Japan -- must learn to look forward, not back.

Review Essay
Nov/Dec
1997
Nicholas D. Kristof

Walter LaFeber and Michael Schaller have both written stimulating diplomatic histories of Japan. Unfortunately, Japan's history is less one of outstanding statesmen than of the people they served.

Review Essay
Sep/Oct
1994
Ross Terrill

Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn have written an insightful book about the late Deng era. The authors look at China with a steady eye, depicting an economy going through the roof and politics stuck in Stalinism.

Essay
Nov/Dec
1993
Nicholas D. Kristof

If its economic growth continues, the rise of China will be the most important change in the global economic, political and military balance of the next century. This growth will be accompanied by environmental degradation, an activist foreign policy, and even military adventures. Yet the pervasive tendency to blame China, and the current regime in particular, is misplaced. Most of China's actions are perfectly understandable attempts by a rising power to expand its influence abroad.