Philip H. Gordon

Capsule Review
May/June
2009
L. Carl Brown

In this book, the authors present a five-point plan to keep the United States and Europe from "losing Turkey" that boils down to "support[ing] liberalism and democracy in Turkey"; promoting a settlement with Armenia, Cyprus, and the Kurds; and renewing a commitment to Turkey's eventual membership in the EU.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Philip H. Gordon

Starting his tale in 1781, with General Charles Cornwallis' surrender to George Washington, and ending it with the British transfer of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, Brendon shows how the British Empire "ended as haphazardly as it began."

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Philip H. Gordon

For most Americans, the liberation of Europe is the story of victorious Allied armies, heroic U.S. soldiers, and European civilians freed from Nazi tyranny by American grit and sacrifice, but Hitchcock reminds readers that the road to freedom Americans rightly celebrate was -- in the experience of the liberated -- long, destructive, and bloody.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Philip H. Gordon

Giegerich argues in this informative monograph that the EU's achievements are "nowhere near commensurate with [its] stated ambition to be a major global-security actor."

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Philip H. Gordon

In this remarkably comprehensive study of the controversial issue of nationality in France, Weil takes issue with the common but overly simplified notion that French immigration laws -- based on the principle of jus soli (citizenship based on place of birth) -- reflect the country's open concept of the nation in contrast to other, more closed or even racist societies.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2009
Philip H. Gordon
Capsule Review
May/June
2008
Philip H. Gordon