R. Daniel Kelemen

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Andrew Moravcsik

This book sets out to explore what the United States could learn about public policy from European countries and examines rules relating to issues of work-family balance, labor-market regulations, climate change policy, urban transport, election law, pensions, and immigration.

Postscript
R. Daniel Kelemen

Last Friday, EU leaders voted to nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as the next president of the European Commission. Juncker’s nomination constituted a major victory for the European Parliament and a humiliating defeat for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Snapshot
R. Daniel Kelemen and Anand Menon

A major battle is brewing that will pit the European Parliament against German Chancellor Angela Merkel and her colleagues in Europe’s national capitals. The winner of that fight will earn the right to shape the EU political system for years to come.

Snapshot
R. Daniel Kelemen

The collapse of the eurozone no longer seems likely, thanks to its members' decisions to coordinate their fiscal policies more closely. But it is exactly that tighter integration that has made many Euro-skeptic Brits want to opt out of the EU altogether.

Snapshot
R. Daniel Kelemen

The eurozone's troubles -- including the possibility of Greece's exit from the union -- no longer qualify as a crisis. What looks like significant instability is really just the slow-motion settling of the continent's new economic order.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2011
Andrew Moravcsik

The EU has developed an adversarial rights-based legal system much like the U.S. one. Kelemen, a political scientist, argues that this is not because Europe copied the United States but because the two have faced similar challenges.

Essay
Jan/Feb
2015
Matthias Matthijs and R. Daniel Kelemen

Despite all the grim predictions, the European Union is not on the verge of collapse. Quite the contrary: if European leaders act with resolve and persistence, the union could experience a rebirth.