Richard Holbrooke

Essay
Sep/Oct
2008
Richard Holbrooke

The next U.S. president will inherit a more difficult set of international challenges than any predecessor since World War II.

Review Essay
May/June
2007
Richard Holbrooke

Little-known heroes of the Holocaust were the rare diplomats who defied their superiors' orders and issued visas to save lives. With Iraqis now scrambling to leave their own country, those examples are as relevant today as ever.

Review Essay
Jul/Aug
2006
Richard Holbrooke

Taken together, Peter Beinart's The Good fight and Joe Klein's Politics Lost provide a road map for a successful, politically savvy Democratic foreign policy.

Essay
Nov/Dec
2002
Richard Holbrooke

Warren Zimmermann's First Great Triumph shows that a century ago Americans were already confronting many of the foreign policy issues on today's agenda.

Review Essay
Nov/Dec
2002
Richard Holbrooke

Warren Zimmermann's First Great Triumph shows that a century ago Americans were already confronting many of the foreign policy issues on today's agenda.

Review Essay
May/Jun
1998
Roger Cohen

Richard Holbrooke's gripping memoir shows how he improvised a makeshift peace in what was left of Bosnia despite a timorous Pentagon, a reluctant president, waweirding allies, and brutal ethnic cleansers. But the Dayton Accord came too late.

Essay
Mar/Apr
1995
Richard Holbrooke

The Congress of Vienna, the Treaty of Versailles, and the NATO-based containment strategy were three pivotal decisions in European diplomacy. Now there is a fourth opportunity to construct a lasting European peace through institutions, new and old. Foremost, NATO must expand, discussing openly which new countries to admit. The Partnership for Peace and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe should coordinate human rights and civilian control of armies. Respect for human rights must extend to Russia, which is why the Chechen campaign has been so disturbing. To turn away from the challenge of this moment and freeze NATO would exact a higher price later.

Essay
Winter
1991
Richard Holbrooke

The end of the Cold War also marks the end of a US-Japanese relationship in which the USA was the senior and Japan the junior partner. The political and economic dynamics of the two countries require a new definition of shared interests between equals. For the USA, this will require a clearer recognition that Japan has paid its debts and earned its parity. For the Japanese, it will require them to "remember two unpleasant and rarely voiced truths: they remain generally unpopular overseas, and the United States is still Japan's best friend, and perhaps at times its only friend".