Richard M. Nixon

Essay
Special
1988
Richard M. Nixon

Begins with a hard-hitting description of Gorbachev as a cold and calculating realist, intent on invigorating the Soviet political and economic system. Warns against the illusion that the West can influence internal developments in the USSR, then discusses (1) Europe's renewed role in the East-West conflict (2) arms control (3) Bush's need to address the issues of Afghanistan and Central America. In particular, argues that NATO must maintain a residual tactical nuclear capability in Europe, and that arms control should be treated as only one part of Western defence policy. Calls for a 'revitalizing' of the Western alliance. Former US president.

Capsule Review
Fall
1988
Gaddis Smith
Essay
Fall
1985
Richard M. Nixon

Forty years ago, U.S. nuclear power was indispensable in ending World War II. In the postwar era, American nuclear superiority was indispensable in deterring Soviet probes that might have led to World War III. But that era is over, and we live in the age of nuclear parity, when each superpower has the means to destroy the other and the rest of the world.

Capsule Review
Spring
1985
William G. Hyland
Capsule Review
Winter
1982
Gaddis Smith
Capsule Review
Fall
1980
Andrew J. Pierre
Essay
Oct
1967
Richard M. Nixon

The war in Viet Nam has for so long dominated our field of vision that it has distorted our picture of Asia. A small country on the rim of the continent has filled the screen of our minds; but it does not fill the map. Sometimes dramatically, but more often quietly, the rest of Asia has been undergoing a profound, an exciting and on balance an extraordinarily promising transformation. One key to this transformation is the emergence of Asian regionalism; another is the development of a number of the Asian economies; another is gathering disaffection with all the old isms that have so long imprisoned so many minds and so many governments. By and large the non-communist Asian governments are looking for solutions that work, rather than solutions that fit a preconceived set of doctrines and dogmas.