Richard N. Cooper

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

Litan sets out to explain a range of ideas that originated with academic economists and that subsequently influenced both economic policy and business practices—usually for good but occasionally for ill. He explores the possibility of applying economic concepts to a wide range of topics, from matchmaking in labor markets to the challenges of traffic congestion.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

Walter Lippmann was among the most prominent American public intellectuals, but Goodwin’s worthy book serves to remind readers that Lippmann was more than a mere pundit. Lippmann was a committed liberal, in the European sense, meaning that he favored free markets and a limited role for government. 

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

In explaining the financial crisis of 2008 and its effects, Galbraith positions himself outside the conventional conservative-liberal spectrum. He urges Americans to adjust their country’s institutional structures—and their personal expectations—to accommodate a lower rate of growth than the one that prevailed during the past half century.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

A common view holds that economic reforms in China stalled or even were reversed during the past decade. But in this carefully documented study, Lardy shows that in reality, China’s private sector has continued to grow and thrive, fueling economic development and investment.  

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2015
Richard N. Cooper

Many believe that the financial crisis of 2008 represented a failure of the international economic system. Drezner argues the contrary: although the system did not prevent the crisis or the subsequent recession, it did avoid a catastrophe on the order of the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Detailed records of professional-league games go back many years and cover many countries, and Palacios-Huerta draws on that copious archive to illuminate and formally test a number of economic propositions.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Both these books feature ideas about the future of innovation from researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Nuclear energy, Fox argues, can provide plentiful electric power at a reasonable cost in a way that most renewable sources of energy cannot.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Yu examines how the consumption habits of young urban Chinese have changed during the past two decades and how consumption both reflects and helps define individuality in China.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2014
Richard N. Cooper

In 1930, John Maynard Keynes gave a famous lecture in which he took an uncharacteristic stab at forecasting the distant future, 100 years away. Palacios-Huerta saw fit to repeat this thought experiment and invited ten prominent economists to imagine economic life circa 2114.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Kramer argues that falling birthrates pose a serious threat to a number of wealthy countries, not only to their economic well-being but also to their national security.

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Hardly a week goes by without news of some malfeasance committed by a large American or European bank. Lewis zeros in on one particularly explosive charge: the claim that major banks engage in predatory trading behavior. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This useful book -- a thorough piece of practical research -- looks closely at how clean energy technologies such as gas turbines, advanced batteries, solar photovoltaics, and coal gasification emerged and spread to China. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Richard N. Cooper

The rapid growth of cross-border business, education, and travel has brought people of different cultural backgrounds closer together than ever before -- and has thereby increased the likelihood of miscommunication and misunderstanding. 

Capsule Review
SEPT/OCT
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Powell argues persuasively that sweatshops, where the conditions are admittedly appalling by Western standards, represent an improvement -- often a significant improvement -- over the alternatives available to their workers. 

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Houser and Mohan provide a sober, largely quantitative assessment of the recent U.S. shale gas boom.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This intriguing book measures social mobility in a novel way, by tracing unusual surnames over several generations in nine different countries.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This interesting book is basically a history of business journalism in the United States, with an emphasis on investigative journalism, whose virtues the author extols.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Foreign trade makes some Americans uncomfortable, partly because it involves, well, foreigners.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This book tells readers how to think about problems in the current international political and economic system, but not exactly what to do about them.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This book is Alan Greenspan's attempt to come to terms with the financial crisis of 2008.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Amazon, Apple, and Google are three firms that have helped define the early twenty-first century.  These easy-to-read books recount the companies’ origins, their evolutions, and their rivalries.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Richard N. Cooper

In this interesting collection, expert analysts assess the costs of ten global problems over the past century, measured in economic terms, and make projections about their costs in 2050.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Walter Bagehot (1826–77) is best known among economists for his oft-quoted views on how central banks should behave, in particular as lenders of last resort.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

To explain the extraordinary performance of Asia's economies, Perkins draws on academic research and on his own decades-long experience as an adviser to developing countries.