Richard N. Cooper

Capsule Review
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This book tells readers how to think about problems in the current international political and economic system, but not exactly what to do about them.

Capsule Review
2014
Richard N. Cooper

This book is Alan Greenspan's attempt to come to terms with the financial crisis of 2008.

Capsule Review
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Amazon, Apple, and Google are three firms that have helped define the early twenty-first century.  These easy-to-read books recount the companies’ origins, their evolutions, and their rivalries.

Capsule Review
2014
Richard N. Cooper

In this interesting collection, expert analysts assess the costs of ten global problems over the past century, measured in economic terms, and make projections about their costs in 2050.

Capsule Review
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Walter Bagehot (1826–77) is best known among economists for his oft-quoted views on how central banks should behave, in particular as lenders of last resort.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

To explain the extraordinary performance of Asia's economies, Perkins draws on academic research and on his own decades-long experience as an adviser to developing countries.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Newman exposes as mere blather much of the what passes for sound discussion of U.S. public debt and the federal government’s debt ceiling.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Lin, a former World Bank chief economist, examines the causes of the 2008 financial crisis.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Ruhs urges receiving countries to prioritize the rights of immigrants, identifying which rights are inalienable and which ones should be considered more malleable.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Richard N. Cooper

Keith, a physicist, argues that humankind would be wise to do some contingency planning for climate change.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

This thought-provoking book is about much more than the 1944 conference that established the architecture of the postwar international monetary system, leading to the establishment of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Blyth takes on the claim that austerity is the best way to enhance growth and reduce public debt and finds it utterly deficient. Stuckler and Basu approach austerity policies from a medical perspective, producing an extensive array of evidence to show that austerity increases illness and death.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Edwards and Lawrence argue that Americans should welcome the growing prosperity of their trading partners.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

A helpful primer on modern central banking by one of its preeminent practitioners.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Goldacre, a British physician, articulately and extensively documents how large pharmaceutical firms have inched up as close as possible to committing outright fraud and occasionally have crossed the threshold.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Why did economists fail to foresee the 2008 global financial crisis? In this engaging history, Gorton answers that question through an exercise in what might be called the epistemology of modern economics.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Pettis asserts that the world economy suffers from unsustainable imbalances that must be eliminated.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

In McKinnon’s view, the dollar-based international financial system has become fragile, due in part to U.S. policies. But it can be strengthened, McKinnon believes, especially with help from China.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Freeland, a journalist and editor at Thomson Reuters, examines how a fairly diverse new class of plutocrats came to be and explores some of the consequences and potential implications of its rise.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Muller, a physicist, considers the future of energy use in terms of elementary physics (what is technically possible) and elementary economics (how much it will cost).

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

The National Intelligence Council (NIC), the forward-looking think tank of the U.S. intelligence community, has produced its latest quadrennial assessment of global trends, a forecast of how the world might change between now and 2030.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Most history is about what happened and why. An attractive feature of this book about the financial crisis of 2008, written by the chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) at the time, is that it covers many official responses to the crisis that were considered but not carried out.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Without taking an institutional position, the IMF has performed a useful service in sponsoring this symposium on the use of fiscal instruments—specifically, a tax on emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide—to mitigate climate change.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Nolan, a British economist, answers the question in his title with a resounding no.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Most analyses of development and poverty alleviation focus on overall economic growth and the design of particular economic programs. In contrast, this book focuses on particular leaders who launched successful efforts to help the poorest (usually rural) members of their societies, drawing attention to the consummate political skills necessary to implement even well-conceived policies.