Richard N. Cooper

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Blyth takes on the claim that austerity is the best way to enhance growth and reduce public debt and finds it utterly deficient. Stuckler and Basu approach austerity policies from a medical perspective, producing an extensive array of evidence to show that austerity increases illness and death.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Edwards and Lawrence argue that Americans should welcome the growing prosperity of their trading partners.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard N. Cooper

A helpful primer on modern central banking by one of its preeminent practitioners.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Goldacre, a British physician, articulately and extensively documents how large pharmaceutical firms have inched up as close as possible to committing outright fraud and occasionally have crossed the threshold.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Why did economists fail to foresee the 2008 global financial crisis? In this engaging history, Gorton answers that question through an exercise in what might be called the epistemology of modern economics.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Pettis asserts that the world economy suffers from unsustainable imbalances that must be eliminated.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

In McKinnon’s view, the dollar-based international financial system has become fragile, due in part to U.S. policies. But it can be strengthened, McKinnon believes, especially with help from China.

Capsule Review
May/June
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Freeland, a journalist and editor at Thomson Reuters, examines how a fairly diverse new class of plutocrats came to be and explores some of the consequences and potential implications of its rise.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Muller, a physicist, considers the future of energy use in terms of elementary physics (what is technically possible) and elementary economics (how much it will cost).

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

The National Intelligence Council (NIC), the forward-looking think tank of the U.S. intelligence community, has produced its latest quadrennial assessment of global trends, a forecast of how the world might change between now and 2030.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Most history is about what happened and why. An attractive feature of this book about the financial crisis of 2008, written by the chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) at the time, is that it covers many official responses to the crisis that were considered but not carried out.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Without taking an institutional position, the IMF has performed a useful service in sponsoring this symposium on the use of fiscal instruments—specifically, a tax on emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide—to mitigate climate change.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Nolan, a British economist, answers the question in his title with a resounding no.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Most analyses of development and poverty alleviation focus on overall economic growth and the design of particular economic programs. In contrast, this book focuses on particular leaders who launched successful efforts to help the poorest (usually rural) members of their societies, drawing attention to the consummate political skills necessary to implement even well-conceived policies.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

The justification for creating temporary monopolies through patents and copyrights is that they encourage creative activity that would not otherwise take place. But Raustiala and Sprigman argue that imitation -- which music labels and movie studios often consider theft -- frequently stimulates creativity rather than discouraging it.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Lin, the former chief economist of the World Bank, makes a case for what he calls a “new structuralist” approach to economic development. Drawing on the experience of many countries, especially China, he argues for an active role for government in fostering development, not only through the traditional provision of infrastructure and the enforcement of rules but also in identifying and supporting industries that contribute to growth.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

In this engaging book, Janeway, a venture capitalist who trained as an economist, combines his academic erudition with lessons learned during 40 years of working in the financial sector. His novel argument is that financial bubbles can be expected to occur from time to time in modern economies and that on balance they contribute to positive economic transformations by financing new technologies, even though many of them inevitably prove to be false starts or dead ends.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Richard N. Cooper

Sharp increases in food prices in 2008 and again in 2012 reminded the world that food security cannot be taken for granted, especially for poor people. Can adequate food supplies be assured? Conway answers with a qualified yes.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2012
Richard N. Cooper

This book is built around case studies of 15 state-owned oil companies, which together account for nearly 50 percent of global oil production and for 56 percent of the world’s proven conventional oil reserves. Its aim is to evaluate the performance of these companies in the exploration, development, refinement (where relevant), and distribution of oil and gas.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2012
Richard N. Cooper

Marsh foresees a fifth industrial revolution, characterized by a greater dispersion of manufacturing around the world.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2012
Richard N. Cooper

Tomasi is troubled not only by the political polarization of contemporary American politics but also by the apparent mutual incompatibility, and hence mutual antagonism, between libertarianism and claims for social justice that require some redistribution of income.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2012
Lawrence D. Freedman

These two books describe how the United States’ role in former French Indochina developed during the 1950s; they are, in essence, pre-histories of the Vietnam War.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2012
Richard N. Cooper

Sinn casts a skeptical eye toward some of the popular nostrums for climate change. He emphasizes the distinction between environmental objectives and policy instruments, arguing that evaluations of the instruments should be based on their actual contributions to objectives, and not on the good feelings that we may get from having simply done something.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2012
Richard N. Cooper

Wong deftly evaluates the efforts of three Asian “tigers” -- Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan -- to enter the biotechnology sector, seen by leaders in all three places as a vital industry of the future.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2012
Richard N. Cooper

Turner makes the case that growth should not be sought as an end in itself in rich countries. Rather, the focus should be on creating economic freedom and making possible a wide range of employment opportunities.