Shannon K. O'Neil

Comment
Jan/Feb
2014
Shannon K. O'Neil

Once hidden behind high tariffs, quotas, subsidies, and hundreds of state-owned enterprises, Mexico’s economy is now one of the most open in the world. But the economic dividends of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s ambitious economic reform agenda have yet to appear.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Richard Feinberg

O’Neil sketches a persuasively optimistic portrait of Mexico, one at odds with the crime-drenched media reports and alarmist warnings of nativists in the United States.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Shannon K. O'Neil

Smith and Selee lead a team of authors in assessing just how far Mexico’s political, economic, and security policies have developed and how they influence U.S.-Mexico diplomacy and the bilateral relationship more broadly.

Essay
Mar/Apr
2013
Shannon K. O'Neil

Even as Mexico continues to struggle with grave security threats, its steady rise is transforming the country's economy, society, and political system. Given the Mexico's bright future and the interests it shares with the United States in energy, manufacturing, and security, Washington needs to start seeing its southern neighbor as a partner instead of a problem.

News & Events
Jorge Castañeda and Shannon K. O'Neil

Jorge G. Castañeda, former foreign minister of Mexico, and Shannon K. O'Neil, CFR senior fellow, discuss Mexico's President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto and the future of U.S.-Mexico relations.

Response
Jul/Aug
2012
Shannon K. O'Neil; Richard Lapper; Larry Rohter; Ronaldo Lemos; and Ruchir Sharma

Brazil's rise never depended on the sale of commodities, and thanks to recent reforms, the country will continue to prosper, write Shannon O'Neil, Richard Lapper, and Larry Rohter. Ronaldo Lemos, meanwhile, claims that those reforms have not gone far enough. Ruchir Sharma responds that Brazil is indeed headed for trouble.

Snapshot
Shannon K. O'Neil

For decades, the PRI maintained control in Mexico by buying votes, co-opting the opposition, and wielding a repressive hand. Now the party could retake the presidency, but whether the PRI will return to its bad old ways is less important than the fact that Mexico's democratic institutions will hem in whoever is elected.

Snapshot
Shannon K. O'Neil

There are now three candidates for Mexico's July 1 presidential election, but it is Josefina Vázquez Mota’s place on the ticket that has the potential to upend the future of the country's politics. Unlike her two challengers, who are linked to the old guard and old boys' network, as a woman Vázquez Mota can claim to be the mantle of change, even against her own party.

Essay
Nov/Dec
2010
Michael Levi, Elizabeth C. Economy, Shannon K. O'Neil, and Adam Segal

Clean-energy technology is expensive and the United States is spending far too little on developing it. The U.S. government must do more to promote cross-border innovation and protect intellectual property rights.

Reading List
Shannon K. O'Neil

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on Mexican politics.

Essay
Jul/Aug
2009
Shannon K. O'Neil

Hysteria over bloodshed in Mexico clouds the real challenge. The rising violence is a product of democratization, and the only real solution is to continue strengthening Mexican democracy.