Stephen Biddle

Essay
Sept/Oct
2013
Stephen Biddle

The Obama administration should either spend the political capital needed for an actual deal with the Taliban or cut its losses and get all the way out of Afghanistan now. So far, the White House has chosen neither path, opting to muddle through instead.

Snapshot
Stephen Biddle

In Afghanistan, even minimally accountable democracy may soon be beyond reach. If so, some form of constrained warlord rule will be the most that's achievable.

Interview
Stephen Biddle

CFR Senior Fellow Stephen Biddle answers questions about the war in Afghanistan.

Essay
Jul/Aug
2010
Stephen Biddle, Fotini Christia, and J Alexander Thier

Since 2001, the West has tried to build a strong centralized government in Afghanistan. But such an approach fits poorly with the country's history and political culture. The most realistic and acceptable alternative models of governance are decentralized democracy and a system of internal mixed sovereignty.

Video
Steven Simon, Stephen Biddle, James F. Hoge Jr.

Stephen Biddle and Steven Simon how to ensure stability continues in Iraq in this inaugural Foreign Affairs Live debate.

Essay
Sep/Oct
2008
Stephen Biddle, Michael E. O'Hanlon, and Kenneth M. Pollack

The situation in Iraq is improving. With the right strategy, the United States will eventually be able to draw down troops without sacrificing stability.

Roundtable
Stephen Biddle, Larry Diamond, James Dobbins, and Leslie H. Gelb

In this special Web-only feature, Stephen Biddle, Larry Diamond, James Dobbins, and Leslie Gelb analyze the report of the Iraq Study Group and debate what should be done in Iraq.

Roundtable
Christopher Hitchens, Fred Kaplan, Marc Lynch, Kevin Drum, Stephen Biddle, and Larry Diamond

In this special web-only supplement, Christopher Hitchens, Fred Kaplan, Kevin Drum, and Marc Lynch respond to the roundtable, "What to Do in Iraq."

Essay
Jul/Aug
2006
Larry Diamond, James Dobbins, Chaim Kaufmann, Leslie H. Gelb, and Stephen Biddle

Can anything -- international mediation, regional collaboration, decentralization, or constitutional negotiations -- save Iraq from a full-fledged civil war and the Bush administration from a foreign policy fiasco?

Essay
Mar/Apr
2006
Stephen Biddle

Most discussions of U.S. policy in Iraq assume that it should be informed by the lessons of Vietnam. But the conflict in Iraq today is a communal civil war, not a Maoist "people's war," and so those lessons are not valid. "Iraqization," in particular, is likely to make matters worse, not better.

See also: "What to Do In Iraq: A Roundtable," a debate including Biddle, Larry Diamond, James Dobbins, Chaim Kaufmann, and Leslie H. Gelb.

"What to Do In Iraq: Responses and Discussion," a debate including Biddle, Christopher Hitchens, Fred Kaplan, Marc Lynch, Kevin Drum, and Diamond.

Essay
Mar/Apr
2003
Stephen Biddle

The stunning success of the combination of special operations forces, precision weapons, and indigenous allies in Afghanistan has led some to laud the "Afghan model" as the future of warfare. Others dismiss it as an anomalous product of local circumstances. but neither position is wholly correct. On closer inspection, the conduct of the war was not as revolutionary as people think.

Review Essay
May/Jun
2002
Stephen Biddle

What happened in Kosovo, and what lessons can be learned from it? Three new books examine the conflict and its influence on how America fights. But as scholars debate the recent past, the new war on terror may rewrite military textbooks once again.