Steven A. Cook

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

If Sisi uses his presidency to establish order, that will be an accomplishment. But it will be a small one, nothing compared to those of Nasser, the man he wishes to be. Indeed, rather than a giant, Sisi will more likely end up as a footnote.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Watching Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan resort to increasingly authoritarian measures in recent months, many observers have called on President Abdullah Gul to step in. But that is unlikely to happen.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

During the AKP decade there have, no doubt, been important changes in Turkish politics, in particular the participation of marginalized groups. But the ongoing corruption scandal illustrates that, at the same time, Turkey is still far -- as far as it was in the 1990s -- from democracy.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Nearly 150 years after its completion, the Suez Canal continues to inspire awe. But given recent developments in politics, economics, and security, some see it as a mere relic. In fact, the waterway ensures Cairo's continued relevance to the United States and the region.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Egypt has had its fill of heroes in the form of Gamal Abdel Nasser, Anwar al-Sadat, Mubarak, and Morsi -- all false prophets of particular versions of modernity -- but it is crying out for leadership. Unfortunately, the politicians stocking the new government do not inspire confidence that Egypt will finally get what it needs.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

As the tear gas wafts over Taksim Square, there is no question that Erdogan still holds the reins of power. For one, it is hard to see how Turkey's moribund opposition can capitalize on his missteps. Further, although AKP supporters are watching the protests with consternation, they are not ditching their membership cards.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood think of themselves as uniquely qualified to rebuild Egypt. Moreover, they believe that they were entrusted with doing so during this year's election. Their miscalculation, though, was to think that the rest of Egypt felt the same way.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Morsi's sacking of Egypt's top military officials follows a familiar playbook. Gamal Abdel Nasser and Anwar al-Sadat made similar moves to consolidate control when they first came to power. And like Nasser and Sadat's gambits, Morsi's will likely lead to a foreign policy realignment.

Snapshot
Michael J. Koplow and Steven A. Cook

Since Recep Tayyip Erdogan took power, the world has watched closely to see if Turkey would become more democratic or more autocratic. Yet it is doing both simultaneously, and the incongruity is threatening its international standing.

Letter From
Steven A. Cook

Hosni Mubarak professed that Egypt was growing economically and progressing politically. The harsh, hopeless reality behind those fabrications proved to be his undoing. Now the country's future rests with two familiar powers playing very unfamiliar roles: The military and the Muslim Brotherhood. Prepare for another year of struggle.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2012
L. Carl Brown

Cook concludes that although Egypt’s future remains very much in doubt, the United States should “take a hands-off approach as Egyptians build a new political system on their own terms.”

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

The Turkish prime minister's recent tour of Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya was meant to distract from his missteps during the Arab Spring. More importantly, it was aimed at convincing Turks that their country is a powerful regional player.

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

Many Egyptian military officers and some civilian politicians are interested in replicating the so-called Turkish model for Egypt, in which the military would play a leading role in guiding society and politics. But such a strategy is a poor fit for the country.

Interview
Steven A. Cook

This week, Steven A. Cook answers readers' questions about Egypt after the rule of Hosni Mubarak. 

Snapshot
Steven A. Cook

With the political era of Hosni Mubarak coming to an end, is the strategic relationship between Cairo and Washington similarly finished? The Obama administration must scale back its ambitions to affect change in Cairo.



This article appears in the Foreign Affairs/CFR eBook, The New Arab Revolt.

Interview
Steven A. Cook and Jared Cohen

Stephen Cook and Jared Cohen answer questions about the protests in Tunisia.

Postscript
Steven A. Cook

The return of Mohamed El Baradei to Egypt has raised questions about the country's political system and the rule of President Hosni Mubarak. Is reform possible, and if so, is El Baradei the man to lead it?



This article appears in the Foreign Affairs/CFR eBook, The New Arab Revolt.

Reading List
Steven A. Cook
An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on the Middle East peace process.
Review Essay
Mar/Apr
2009
Steven A. Cook

Bruce Rutherford’s Egypt After Mubarak is an ambitious effort to explain how the Muslim Brotherhood, the judiciary, and the business sector can work in parallel, if not exactly together, to influence Egypt’s political future.

Essay
Mar/Apr
2005
Steven A. Cook

If President Bush hopes to make good on his promise to bring democracy to the Arab world, he must rethink U.S. strategy, which overemphasizes civil society and economic development. Neither has caused much political liberalization in the Middle East, nor have more punitive measures. To promote Arab democracy, Washington needs a new approach: offering financial incentives for political reform.