Sumit Ganguly

Capsule Review
2014
G. John Ikenberry

This book represents one of the best efforts yet to understand why interstate wars emerge, persist, and, most important, end.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

It is tempting to assume that India's upcoming national election will pit the forces of progressivism, embodied by the ruling Indian National Congress Party, against the forces of cultural and religious nationalism, represented by the Bharatiya Janata Party. In truth, both major parties have failed to live up to their platforms -- and voters know it. In the end, this spring's real winners might be the country's smaller regional parties.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

For the past several weeks, thousands have rallied around a single issue: bringing to justice the collaborators who, in early 1971, helped the Pakistani military put down the Bengali nationalist movement. The timing might seem strange, since the demands for justice are coming well over four decades after the tragic events. But they are part of a struggle over Bangladesh’s identity that has raged for decades.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

For the past several weeks, thousands have rallied around a single issue: bringing to justice the collaborators who, in early 1971, helped the Pakistani military put down the Bengali nationalist movement. The timing might seem strange, since the demands for justice are coming well over four decades after the tragic events. But they are part of a struggle over Bangladesh’s identity that has raged for decades.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

Late this month, India's Congress Party created a new post -- party vice president -- and then named Rahul Gandhi to it. The effort, led by party elite, was meant to shore up the status of this scion of the powerful Gandhi-Nehru clan and place him on the path to the prime ministership. In a maturing Indian democracy, though, such tricks may no longer work for Gandhi or for the party.

Snapshot
Sunila S. Kale and Sumit Ganguly

Most explanations of the massive blackout in India point to extraordinary circumstances and inadequate supplies of electricity. In fact, the central and state governments' mismanagement of the supplies that do exist deserves much of the blame.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

There is little doubt Rahul Gandhi will succeed Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. Only, as he seems destined to inherit a political mess, is two years enough to prepare him for the challenge of a lifetime?

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly

Recent anti-corruption protests have managed to stoke anger among significant segments of India’s electorate. The current government will not be able to fend it off without making some tangible concessions, such as extending the scope of the anti-corruption bill currently under discussion in India's parliament.

Capsule Review
Sep/Oct
2010
Andrew J. Nathan

This book is set up as a debate between the two authors over whether nuclearization has created a barrier to escalation during crises between the two nations or whether it has instead created a shield for Pakistani adventurism and a risk of Indian overreaction.

Snapshot
Sumit Ganguly and S. Paul Kapur

During its first few months in office, the Obama administration has essentially ignored India. This could be a serious strategic blunder, given India and the United States' shared interests.

Roundtable
Stephen P. Cohen, C. Christine Fair, Sumit Ganguly, Shaun Gregory, Aqil Shah, and Ashley J. Tellis

A Foreign Affairs roundtable discussion on the causes of instability in Pakistan and what, if anything, can be done about them.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2009
Lawrence D. Freedman

This is a fascinating collection of case studies of instances in which regular forces have found themselves trying to cope with armed groups that have occupied holy places, mainly mosques (in Iraq, Islamabad, Kashmir, Mecca, and Thailand) but also one church (in Bethlehem) and a temple (in Amritsar, India).

Capsule Review
May/June
2008
Lucian W. Pye
Essay
Jul/Aug
2006
Sumit Ganguly

India's growing economic and diplomatic prominence is unlikely to be derailed by its territorial dispute with Pakistan over Kashmir. But given the risk that the Kashmir issue could spark a nuclear war, it is in India's best interest that it be resolved. Washington should use its influence with Islamabad to broker an agreement and thereby cement its growing strategic partnership with New Delhi.

Postscript
Sumit Ganguly

Last month the Bush administration announced plans to sell India civilian nuclear technology, prompting a firestorm of criticism from nonproliferation advocates charging that the move would reward irresponsible behavior and spur proliferation elsewhere. Indiana University's Sumit Ganguly argued in Foreign Affairs back in 2001 that Washington's approach to nuclear issues on the subcontinent was outdated. In this postscript, he explains why the Bush administration's new policy makes eminent sense and why the criticisms of it are specious.

Capsule Review
Sep/Oct
2003
Lucian W. Pye
Essay
Nov/Dec
2002
Sumit Ganguly

Three new books detail 50 years of misrule in a country ill served by its overweening military. Now Pervez Musharraf seems bound to repeat these mistakes.

Review Essay
Sep/Oct
2001
Sumit Ganguly

With its two nuclear tests in 1998, India provoked bitter international criticism and retaliatory tests from Pakistan. But in India's Emerging Nuclear Posture, Ashley Tellis argues that fears about nuclear instability in South Asia may be unfounded-and that the time has come for Washington to rethink its unyielding policy on nonproliferation.

Comment
Mar/Apr
2000
Sumit Ganguly

Pakistan needs across-the-board reforms, but the record of military regimes in this hapless country offers scant hope that General Pervez Musharraf will get the job done.