Walter Russell Mead

Essay
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Whether it is Russian forces seizing Crimea, China making aggressive claims in its coastal waters, or Iran trying to dominate the Middle East, old-fashioned power plays are back. These revisionist powers never bought into the geopolitical settlement that followed the Cold War, and their ongoing attempts to overturn it will not be peaceful.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

In O’Rourke’s view, the boomers, a frivolous group that can boast of few cultural or intellectual accomplishments, were the first post-historical generation.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Marsden returns to the almost forgotten work of U.S. public intellectuals of the late 1950s and early 1960s

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Rizzo, formerly the top lawyer for the CIA, has written as close to a tell-all memoir as the CIA’s review board will permit.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

In this analytic tour de force, Sestanovich offers a useful and often original look at the strategies of the last 12 American presidents.

Capsule Review
May/June
2014
Walter Russell Mead

White has written an unusual and important book that grounds its discussion of the United States’ contemporary budget woes in a history of American fiscal policy.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Gates offers some trenchant criticisms of the way executive and legislative policymakers have addressed the problems of the last eight years.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Walter Russell Mead

The intellectual thread that runs through this series of essays, and the likely source of the controversy that surrounds Sunstein’s work, is a kind of moral monism at the core of his thought.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Walter Russell Mead

In this lively and probing book, Levin, one of the most influential conservative writers in the United States, looks at the ideas of Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Walter Russell Mead

This is a rich repository of information about the quirkiest branch of the U.S. government.

Capsule Review
Mar/Apr
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Baker has produced the first comprehensive narrative history of what will surely remain one of the most controversial presidential administrations in U.S. history.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Walter Russell Mead

In this brave and bracing book, Joffe treats past predictions of American decline to the merciless debunking they deserve.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Nau is interesting, provocative, and sometimes convincing when he looks for signs of conservative internationalism through the long sweep of U.S. history.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Two recent books by leading figures in the fight for the future of American education illustrate the passions at play in one of the country’s most important debates.

Capsule Review
Jan/Feb
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Peraino begins with Lincoln’s opposition to the Mexican-American War and chronicles his later management, as president, of relations with France and the United Kingdom during the Civil War.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Peraino begins with Lincoln’s opposition to the Mexican-American War and chronicles his later management, as president, of relations with France and the United Kingdom during the Civil War.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Walter Russell Mead

The book lacks an organizing grand narrative that would tie together its blizzard of frequently startling insights into just how much change the future will bring.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Nye makes a compelling case that transactional leaders, such as Dwight Eisenhower and George H. W. Bush, often get more done than swaggering high rollers, such as Theodore Roosevelt and George W. Bush.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Walter Russell Mead

The portrait Amstutz draws of evangelical foreign policy activism and thought does not always flatter his subject; he is frank about some of the theological, intellectual, and institutional challenges that face American evangelicals seeking to influence U.S. policy and world events.

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2013
Walter Russell Mead

In the most entertaining and depressing book about the U.S. political system published in many years, Leibovich lets readers peep behind the curtain and see what goes on in the greenrooms and at the parties of the Washington elite.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Walter Russell Mead

In a book that deserves to be read by Republicans who care about their party’s future, Lowry calls for a return to the ideas of President Abraham Lincoln.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Although little remembered today, Josephus Daniels was a pivotal figure in twentieth-century U.S. politics.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Nasr makes a powerful case that U.S. strategy in Afghanistan and the Middle East is muddled and confused.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Amid the careful political strategy and slow but inexorable unfolding of Roosevelt’s relentless march toward war, these emissaries -- among them W. Averell Harriman, Sumner Welles, and Harry Hopkins -- were significantly less important than Fullilove maintains.

Capsule Review
Sept/Oct
2013
Walter Russell Mead

Although the United States is currently enjoying something of a global strategic respite, the domestic foundations on which American strength depends are under threat.