William M. LeoGrande

Capsule Review
Nov/Dec
2012
William M. LeoGrande

In time for the 20th anniversary of the end of El Salvador’s decadelong civil war, Negroponte has written a detailed and nuanced account of the negotiations that led to peace.

Capsule Review
Sep/Oct
2009
Richard Feinberg

The 49 contributions to this outstanding anthology trace continuity and change during Cuba's "special period" (1986-2006) in the country's foreign policy, domestic economics and politics, social values, culture, and media.

Essay
Summer
1980
William M. LeoGrande and Carla Anne Robbins

Not since Vietnam has the domino theory enjoyed such currency in Washington. Less than a year after Nicaraguan President Anastasio Somoza was driven from Managua by the first Latin American revolution in two decades, neighboring El Salvador teeters on the brink of full-scale insurrection. In truth, El Salvador has hardly had a government over the past 12 months. The nation_s nominal rulers have long since lost control of their own security forces and today stand isolated amidst a rising tide of political violence from both Right and Left.

Essay
Fall
1979
William M. LeoGrande

For two decades, the hemispheric policy of the United States has been haunted by the specter of "another Cuba." The fear that Cuba's revolutionary upheaval might be repeated elsewhere energized the Alliance for Progress and, when progress gave way to order, that same fear justified providing counterinsurgency assistance to a continent increasingly dominated by military dictatorships. Lyndon Johnson sent a force of 20,000 men to the Dominican Republic in 1965 to prevent "another Cuba," and Henry Kissinger unleashed the CIA on Chile for the same reason.