Books & Reviews

Review Essays

Review Essay,
Jordan Chandler Hirsch

The Egyptian-Israeli peace deal is the one aspect of the Middle Eastern order that has not fallen apart in recent years. But a new book misinterprets Washington's contribution to the agreement. Far from breaking the shackles of religion, history, and geopolitics that had previously ensnared the parties and prevented them from making concessions, the United States played a much more modest role.

Review Essay,
Daniel Falkiner

The new book A Troublesome Inheritance confirms that the basic biological facts of race and human evolution are indisputable. But at certain moments, the book ceases to be a scientific inquiry into race and becomes something far more troubling.

Review Essay,
SEPT/OCT
2014
John Osburg

Will Chinese economic development ultimately lead to political development? In his new book, Age of Ambition, the journalist Evan Osnos discovers what might be the missing link: the emergence in Chinese society of a search for dignity.

Capsule Reviews

Capsule Review,
SEPT/OCT
2014
Walter Russell Mead

Hard Choices is more a manifesto than a memoir. It is best understood as Clinton’s attempt to position herself for the intense political battles she will likely face in the next few years as the front-runner for the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. Still, it is a rich and even compelling read, hinting at how Clinton wants to be seen in the culminating years of her political career. The memoir pulls off a deft political balancing act; Clinton distinguishes herself from President Barack Obama even as she highlights her loyalty to the man she served as secretary of state.

Capsule Review,
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

Governments around the world have fallen on hard times, and the crisis seems especially acute among the liberal Western states that until recently enjoyed decades of unprecedented prosperity and stability. Western powers that ushered in the Industrial Revolution and the rise of the liberal order are now barely able to perform rudimentary tasks. When beleaguered Western leaders look over their shoulders, they see authoritarian Asian countries -- especially China and Singapore -- gaining ground.

Capsule Review,
SEPT/OCT
2014
G. John Ikenberry

The Western liberal tradition rests on free markets, limited government, human rights, and the rule of law. But as Jahn notes, those concepts originated as guides to the organization of domestic politics, and the effort to project them onto the international system, which began in the early nineteenth century, has been marked by tensions, dilemmas, tradeoffs, and contradictions.

Foreign Affairs Books

Foreign Affairs Books are collections of seminal essays which first appeared in the pages of Foreign Affairs. Whether policy analysis, reportage or review essay each piece offers lasting value. Collectively these articles frame current debates over crucial issues in American foreign policy and world politics. You can find ordering information for Foreign Affairs Books on the individual book pages listed below.

After the latest round of Middle East peace talks collapsed earlier this year, it was only a matter of time before Israelis and Palestinians came to blows yet again. Our latest eBook, Clueless in Gaza, brings together top-notch experts from all perspectives to tell the full story of the recent fighting, from causes to consequences

Ever since the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, the questions about what would follow Saddam and what role the United States would play in Iraq’s ultimate destiny have been controversial and hotly debated. To help you understand today’s headlines, we’ve pulled together the best of our coverage in a new eBook, Endgame in Iraq.

Twenty-five years after the protests, we are delighted to bring you Tiananmen and After, which includes a trove of secret documents showing why China’s leaders opted for violence at Tiananamen Square along with expert commentary on what happened back in June 1989, what it meant, and how China has—and hasn’t—changed since then.