Books & Reviews

Review Essays

Review Essay,
Jan/Feb
2015
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Michael Mandelbaum

According to Ian Morris, the author of a sweeping history of conflict from prehistoric times to the present, war can sometimes produce safety. But his account runs into difficulties as it approaches the present.

Capsule Reviews

Capsule Review,
Mar/Apr
2015
Greg Mills

Frequent predictions of the demise of President Robert Mugabe and Zimbabwe’s collapse have underestimated Mugabe’s political abilities and staying power and the support he enjoys among Zimbabweans. In his transformation from liberator to tyrant, Mugabe has managed to ride out even the worst self-inflicted economic storms, including hyperinflation.

Capsule Review,
Mar/Apr
2015
Nicolas van de Walle

Many observers have noted that diaspora communities often provide manpower, funding, and logistical support to radical or violent groups in low-income, war-torn countries. This collection of essays focuses on the interaction of diaspora groups and the countries of the Horn of Africa and paints a more nuanced picture. Decades of conflict in the region have driven significant populations of Eritreans, Ethiopians, and Somalis to Europe, the Gulf states, and North America.

Capsule Review,
Mar/Apr
2015
Nicolas van de Walle

Heilbrunn’s well-informed book disputes the conventional wisdom that oil wealth represents a “resource curse” for countries in Africa. To be sure, his detailed reports of corruption, messy politics, and incompetent leadership in the continent’s dozen or so oil-producing states suggest that oil has not always aided the cause of political and social development—to put it mildly. But Heilbrunn argues that colonialism left these countries extremely vulnerable to the negative effects of oil wealth.

Foreign Affairs Books

Foreign Affairs Books are collections of seminal essays which first appeared in the pages of Foreign Affairs. Whether policy analysis, reportage or review essay each piece offers lasting value. Collectively these articles frame current debates over crucial issues in American foreign policy and world politics. You can find ordering information for Foreign Affairs Books on the individual book pages listed below.

The annual World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland, is the premier gathering place for the global elite. As background reading, the 2015 attendees received a special Foreign Affairs book produced just for them: The New Global Context: A Davos Reader.

Catch up on everything you've missed in 2014—from John Mearsheimer on the West's responsibility for the Ukraine crisis, to Elizabeth Economy on Xi Jinping's seizure of power in China, to Tyler Cowen's evisceration of Thomas Piketty's bestseller on economic inequality, and 17 more.

After the latest round of Middle East peace talks collapsed earlier this year, it was only a matter of time before Israelis and Palestinians came to blows yet again. Our latest eBook, Clueless in Gaza, brings together top-notch experts from all perspectives to tell the full story of the recent fighting, from causes to consequences