Books & Reviews

Review Essays

Review Essay,
Jan/Feb
2015
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Michael Mandelbaum

According to Ian Morris, the author of a sweeping history of conflict from prehistoric times to the present, war can sometimes produce safety. But his account runs into difficulties as it approaches the present.

Capsule Reviews

Capsule Review,
Jan/Feb
2015
Nicolas van de Walle

Boraine, an influential white antiapartheid activist, has written a scathing critique of the African National Congress, the black-dominated party that has ruled South Africa for the past two decades. Boraine’s account of the party’s corruption breaks no new ground; nor does his argument that the ANC’s intolerance of criticism results from the antidemocratic internal culture the party forged during its long struggle for power.

Capsule Review,
Jan/Feb
2015
Nicolas van de Walle

This book’s title is drawn from a comment that a close ally of Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir made after South Sudan gained its independence from Sudan in 2011, as he bid good riddance to a region that had been like a “poisonous thorn” in Khartoum’s heart. But Copnall shows that the cultural, political, and economic links between the countries remain dense and complicated and argues that the two sides need to forge a productive relationship if either is to thrive.

Capsule Review,
Jan/Feb
2015
Nicolas van de Walle

Despite the title of this book, the heroes of Edwards’ entertaining account of Tanzania’s development in the 1980s and 1990s are the international donors who imposed reforms on the country’s socialist government after President Julius Nyerere’s policies had ruined the economy. In the immediate postindependence era, international aid had provided support to those same counterproductive policies—hence the toxicity referred to in the title.

Foreign Affairs Books

Foreign Affairs Books are collections of seminal essays which first appeared in the pages of Foreign Affairs. Whether policy analysis, reportage or review essay each piece offers lasting value. Collectively these articles frame current debates over crucial issues in American foreign policy and world politics. You can find ordering information for Foreign Affairs Books on the individual book pages listed below.

Catch up on everything you've missed in 2014—from John Mearsheimer on the West's responsibility for the Ukraine crisis, to Elizabeth Economy on Xi Jinping's seizure of power in China, to Tyler Cowen's evisceration of Thomas Piketty's bestseller on economic inequality, and 17 more.

After the latest round of Middle East peace talks collapsed earlier this year, it was only a matter of time before Israelis and Palestinians came to blows yet again. Our latest eBook, Clueless in Gaza, brings together top-notch experts from all perspectives to tell the full story of the recent fighting, from causes to consequences

Ever since the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, the questions about what would follow Saddam and what role the United States would play in Iraq’s ultimate destiny have been controversial and hotly debated. To help you understand today’s headlines, we’ve pulled together the best of our coverage in a new eBook, Endgame in Iraq.