Books & Reviews

Review Essays

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Michael Mandelbaum

According to Ian Morris, the author of a sweeping history of conflict from prehistoric times to the present, war can sometimes produce safety. But his account runs into difficulties as it approaches the present.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Lawrence D. Freedman

A hundred years after World War I, new accounts of the drama help readers navigate the intricacies of European politics and the political and diplomatic maneuverings that kicked off the war. Yet there is still no consensus on its origins or lessons.

Capsule Reviews

Capsule Review,
Nov/Dec
2014
Edited by David Marshall
G. John Ikenberry

During the last two decades, promoting the rule of law has become a global industry. Well-financed activists, governments, and international organizations have championed the cause, touting improved rule of law as a way to reduce poverty, secure human rights, and prevent conflict. All the contributors to this volume affirm the importance of promoting the rule of law in troubled and transitional societies, using tools such as foreign aid and technical assistance.

Capsule Review,
Nov/Dec
2014
Andrew J. Nathan

The Nepalese Maoist movement emerged at an unlikely time: the mid-1990s, when communism was in global retreat. But by 2006, the movement had gained control over most of Nepal’s countryside and had become the largest party in the country’s parliament. This thoroughly researched book reveals how this happened. The leaders were mostly educated youths from marginalized upper-caste families.

Capsule Review,
Nov/Dec
2014
Nicolas van de Walle

The Kagame regime in Rwanda continues to enjoy a solid reputation in the West, earning plaudits for its role in ending the 1994 genocide, promoting economic growth since then, and advocating national reconciliation. Thomson’s provocative study offers a useful corrective to that overly charitable conventional wisdom.

Foreign Affairs Books

Foreign Affairs Books are collections of seminal essays which first appeared in the pages of Foreign Affairs. Whether policy analysis, reportage or review essay each piece offers lasting value. Collectively these articles frame current debates over crucial issues in American foreign policy and world politics. You can find ordering information for Foreign Affairs Books on the individual book pages listed below.

After the latest round of Middle East peace talks collapsed earlier this year, it was only a matter of time before Israelis and Palestinians came to blows yet again. Our latest eBook, Clueless in Gaza, brings together top-notch experts from all perspectives to tell the full story of the recent fighting, from causes to consequences

Ever since the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, the questions about what would follow Saddam and what role the United States would play in Iraq’s ultimate destiny have been controversial and hotly debated. To help you understand today’s headlines, we’ve pulled together the best of our coverage in a new eBook, Endgame in Iraq.

Twenty-five years after the protests, we are delighted to bring you Tiananmen and After, which includes a trove of secret documents showing why China’s leaders opted for violence at Tiananamen Square along with expert commentary on what happened back in June 1989, what it meant, and how China has—and hasn’t—changed since then.