Books & Reviews

Review Essays

Review Essay,
Jan/Feb
2015
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Review Essay,
Nov/Dec
2014
Michael Mandelbaum

According to Ian Morris, the author of a sweeping history of conflict from prehistoric times to the present, war can sometimes produce safety. But his account runs into difficulties as it approaches the present.

Capsule Reviews

Capsule Review,
2015
Robert Legvold

Economic development specialists and agencies used to consider corruption to be a secondary issue. Now, they see it as not merely a factor in dysfunctional economies but also a potential source of extremist violence and terrorism. For her part, McMann looks at how corruption figures in the daily lives of people struggling to meet their basic needs in the turmoil of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan, societies moving from Soviet-style economies to market-based ones.

Capsule Review,
2015
Robert Legvold

Notwithstanding the many issues on which China and Russia agree these days, conventional wisdom holds that a real alliance between the two powers is not in the cards. The growing gap in power, the historical sources of enmity, and the cultural divide make it impossible, the thinking goes. But those assumptions ought to be reconsidered. The evolving, multidimensional nature of national identity under Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin, Rozman argues, is bringing the two countries together in profound ways.

Capsule Review,
2015
Robert Legvold

In the 1980s, Radovan Karadzic was a practicing psychiatrist and a published poet living a middle-class life in Sarajevo with a wife and two children. Nothing about him suggested the capacity for the fierce ethnic nationalism, violence, and sadism that swept him to power as the leader of the Serbian Democratic Party and then president of the Republika Srpska, an enclave carved by force out of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Foreign Affairs Books

Foreign Affairs Books are collections of seminal essays which first appeared in the pages of Foreign Affairs. Whether policy analysis, reportage or review essay each piece offers lasting value. Collectively these articles frame current debates over crucial issues in American foreign policy and world politics. You can find ordering information for Foreign Affairs Books on the individual book pages listed below.

With the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham still on the rampage and at the top of the U.S. national security agenda, we at Foreign Affairs have put together this companion eBook to Endgame in Iraq, in which our authors carefully examine the nature of the ISIS threat, the current state of the war against it, and the options for what to do next.

The annual World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland, is the premier gathering place for the global elite. As background reading, the 2015 attendees received a special Foreign Affairs book produced just for them: The New Global Context: A Davos Reader.

Catch up on everything you've missed in 2014—from John Mearsheimer on the West's responsibility for the Ukraine crisis, to Elizabeth Economy on Xi Jinping's seizure of power in China, to Tyler Cowen's evisceration of Thomas Piketty's bestseller on economic inequality, and 17 more.