Features

Snapshots

Snapshot,
Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman

Exactly how bad is climate change going to be? That’s no small question. It’s also the wrong one.

Snapshot,
Snapshot,
Matthew Johnson

The United Kingdom is set to go to the polls to select among a wider variety of parties than ever before. At stake in this election is more than control of Westmister. Indeed, it is the concept of British identity as a whole.

Letters From

Letter From,
David Schenker

In the course of two hours, Rudaynah al Otti, a Jordanian parliamentarian, saw almost 20 of her constituents. The brief meetings were evenly punctuated—nearly every three minutes—by a stream of calls on her mobile phone. She was courteous (she always started by asking about her constituent’s family) but then got straight to business. This is politics in Jordan.

Letter From,
Michael J. Bustamante

Average Cubans on depressed state salaries are already hurrying to grab the last of this year’s delayed crop of potatoes. Across town,Sara’s Bar draws patrons from the island’s foreign-currency-holding elite with a conspicuous imitation of South Beach chic. And ten minutes away, the red flag of the Soviet Union proudly advertises a new private Russian restaurant, complete with Lenin-era propaganda posters to lend the décor the right amount of nostalgic kitsch.

Letter From,
Vasundhara Sirnate

Although they both want the same things—protection from counterterrorism gone awry and development—Jammu’s Hindu population and Muslim Kashmiris have different answers about how to get them. Modi's election laid these divisions bare.

Postscripts

Postscript,
Michael Bröning

The establishment of a truly representative Arab army operating under the auspices of a reformed Arab League would be a welcome addition to the region, but the proposed “unified Arab force”—helpful in glossing over tensions among Sunni states but detrimental to relations between the Arab League and Iran—is not.

Postscript,
Matt Mossman

Nigeria’s election may have ended with a winner and a loser, but it was more about the process than the candidates. And there, great gains were made.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Greece and its European partners are now expected to reach a new, long-term deal for the country’s financing by June. Given the dire state of the Greek finances and its continuing exclusion from bond markets, this agreement could take the form of a third bailout reaching 30 billion euros.

Reading Lists

Reading List,
Joel D. Barkan

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on Kenya.

Reading List,
Charles King

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on the Caucasus.

Reading List,
Cynthia McClintock

An annotated Foreign Affairs syllabus on Peruvian politics.

Comments

Comment, 2015
Gideon Rose

In recent decades, China has surged from totalitarian poverty to middle-income authoritarianism. This transformation has been one of the great events in human history. But Beijing has already picked most of the low-hanging fruit of modernization and is now bumping up against the classic challenges of the middle phases of development. Our deep dive into China's condition looks at what's happening today—and what might happen tomorrow.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
James L. Gibson

Apartheid’s legacy of mistrust and prejudice has prevented South Africa from establishing a truly stable multiracial democracy. But increasing contact among the races and the emergence of a black middle class offer hope of reducing the role of race in national politics.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
Gideon Rose

Shale isn’t the only energy story of interest, nor even the only potentially revolutionary one. The electricity sector is quietly undergoing its own transformation, and it is likely to yield dramatic economic and social benefits.

Essays

Essay, 2015
Jess Lowenberg-DeBoer

"Precision agriculture" is revolutionizing farming as we know it. Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and customize how they cultivate each square foot, boosting yields and reducing waste. Big data is the key to the future of the green revolution.

Essay, 2015
Andrew Palmer

Wall Street may have helped engineer the economic crash of 2008 through its incessant experimentation, but not all familiar practices are safe and not all financial innovation is evil. The challenge is promoting innovation that helps improve lives and economic prospects rather than undermining them.

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Responses

Response,
Sue Mi Terry and Max Boot

The case of North Korea clearly exposes the dangers of the United States seeking a nuclear agreement with a state that has no intention of abiding by one. The United States’ experience with North Korea should make it wary of similar nuclear negotiations, especially with Iran.

Response,
Jonathan Schlefer

In my article, I tried to dissect how the Mexican state can be so successful in some dimensions and so troubled in others, with an aim toward suggesting a way to a better future. That, rather than nit picking, should be the pursuit of all observers of Mexico.

Response, Jan/Feb 2015
Lawrence J. Korb; Rick Brennan

Korb argues that Iraqi politicians and American generals are to blame for the bungled withdrawal from Iraq. Brennan replies.