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Comment, May/June 2014
David M. Levinson

Electric vehicles account for only a fraction of cars sold, but they are far more efficient than gasoline-powered ones and technological advances are making them look more promising than ever before. For the first time in a century, a real competition over how to power transportation is underway.

Comment, May/June 2014
Fred Krupp

The shale revolution carries real environmental dangers, especially the release of methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. It still has the potential to benefit the environment as well as the economy, but only if industry and government work together to deal with the problems.

Comment, May/June 2014
Robert A. Hefner III

Thanks to new technologies, U.S. companies have extracted vast quantities of natural gas and oil trapped in once-inaccessible deposits of shale. Other countries may envy this economic boost, but they will find it hard to replicate -- because only America has the entrepreneur-friendly legal and regulatory system that made the boom possible.

Comment, May/June 2014
Per F. Peterson, Michael R. Laufer, and Edward D. Blandford

Nuclear power remains the best way to produce large amounts of electricity reliably for homes and businesses. That is why the continuing deficit in nuclear innovation is so troubling, and why Washington needs to seek additional strategies to incentivize and support progress.

Comment, May/June 2014
Sharon E. Burke

The Defense Department is the United States’ largest energy consumer, but it’s also a major incubator of cutting-edge technologies. To cut fuel demands and meet new threats, the Pentagon is transforming the U.S. military from an organization that uses as much fuel as it can get to one that uses only as much as it needs.

Comment, May/June 2014
Gideon Rose and Jonathan Tepperman

When we started putting together a package on the rapidly evolving future of energy, our first thought was to survey exciting innovations across the sector. But the closer we looked, the more we realized that one big thing -- shale -- loomed above the rest.

Comment, May/June 2014
Edward L. Morse

Despite its doubters and haters, the shale revolution in oil and gas production is here to stay. In the second half of this decade, moreover, it is likely to spread rapidly around the globe, driving a fundamental change in global energy markets and an economic surge.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2014
Jake Kendall and Rodger Voorhies

Most of the world’s poor lack a basic savings account, but the humble cell phone may change all that. Thanks to mobile finance, banks can now offer critical services to more people and in more places than ever before, helping them escape poverty for good.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2014
Jan-Werner Müller

Ten years ago, eight eastern European states joined the European Union, seemingly locking them onto an upward developmental trajectory. But now this supposed triumph is in serious doubt, as most those countries are experiencing profound political crises.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2014
Ira Trivedi

Last December, India's Supreme Court re-established a colonial era law prohibiting homosexual relations. That will mix poorly with an Indian society that has a long tradition of tolerance for sexual minorities.

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