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Letter From,
David Schenker

In the course of two hours, Rudaynah al Otti, a Jordanian parliamentarian, saw almost 20 of her constituents. The brief meetings were evenly punctuated—nearly every three minutes—by a stream of calls on her mobile phone. She was courteous (she always started by asking about her constituent’s family) but then got straight to business. This is politics in Jordan.

Letter From,
Michael J. Bustamante

Average Cubans on depressed state salaries are already hurrying to grab the last of this year’s delayed crop of potatoes. Across town,Sara’s Bar draws patrons from the island’s foreign-currency-holding elite with a conspicuous imitation of South Beach chic. And ten minutes away, the red flag of the Soviet Union proudly advertises a new private Russian restaurant, complete with Lenin-era propaganda posters to lend the décor the right amount of nostalgic kitsch.

Letter From,
Vasundhara Sirnate

Although they both want the same things—protection from counterterrorism gone awry and development—Jammu’s Hindu population and Muslim Kashmiris have different answers about how to get them. Modi's election laid these divisions bare.

Letter From,
Gregory Feifer

From Klaipeda to Vilnius, Lithuanians are preparing for the day that Russian President Vladimir Putin turns from Crimea and the civil war in eastern Ukraine toward them or their neighbors in Latvia and Estonia. Their jitters are understandable; every family in the Baltics has direct experience with Russian occupation.

Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Letter From,
Kayhan Barzegar

U.S. President Barak Obama has set a difficult goal in the war against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). To achieve it, he will need to bring Iran on board, especially in the Syrian peace talks.

Letter From,
Jérôme Tubiana

In South Sudan's latest war, where alliances are made and broken at dizzying speed, there is little evidence that the recent ceasefire agreement will actually end the fighting.

Letter From,
Frederic Wehrey

Amid the political and communal divisions tearing apart Libya, the commercial hub of Misrata—and its pragmatic business community—offer modest hope for a political solution.

Letter From,
Devin Stewart

Working women have long struggled to make their way in Japan, even in comparison to their counterparts in other advanced countries. But now many Japanese companies are acting to change that on their own—a shift that could provide a much-needed boost to the country's economy.

Letter From,
Nathaniel Parish Flannery
The wave of antigovernment protests sweeping Mexico was set off by the disappearance and presumed deaths of 43 college students. But the real reasons for people's anger lie deeper.

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