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Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, has recently become a hotbed for discussions of federalism. It could be a bellwether for the rest of Ukraine’s east.

Letter From,
Boris Muñoz

Like his successor, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro tends to blame his country's violence problem on inequality. Yet if the government has made significant progress reducing inequality, and if, as Hugo Chávez believed, violence is derived from social injustice, what explains the recent surge in crime?

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

No sooner had embattled Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled office than his old nemesis, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, was back on the scene. Her return, which could upset the fragile balance among the three opposition leaders that helped boot Yanukovych, has already sparked concerns that this week marked the end of one president's rule but not the start of something new.

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

In a statement earlier today, Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych announced that he had reached a deal with the opposition to end the violence in Ukraine. Yet the events of the last few days show that it will likely take more than that to end the unrest in Kiev.

Letter From,
Vivian Salama

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni calls the country's recently discovered oil reserves "my oil" and has pushed a major new refinery project to shore up his presidency for life.

Letter From,
Dorn Townsend

For the past four years, Afghan television stations have been flooding the country’s airwaves with a steady stream of crime dramas and courtroom documentaries. Backed by foreign donors, the series have two benefits: they offer a valuable education in civil procedure and help develop popular expectations of equality before the law.

Letter From,
Alexander Wooley

The Tanzanian government hopes to turn the inefficient port of Dar es Salaam into a major regional trade hub, catapulting Tanzania into the global ranks of middle-income countries. But traveling the traffic-clogged roads that take the port's imports to the rest of the country, it is clear that the government has a lot of work to do.

Letter From,
Duncan McCargo

Railing against the Yingluck Shinawatra-led government in Thailand might provide some instant gratification for Bangkok’s frustrated middle classes, but these are the moves of people who are in deep denial about political realities: Thailand’s urbanized villagers -- among whom Yingluck and her brother, Thaksin, remain popular -- are the country’s future.

Letter From,
Cara Eckholm

As Estonia, Ukraine, and many others have learned, tearing down monuments linked to the old guard is only a start. Deciding what to put in its place is the harder challenge.

Letter From,
Rory McCarthy

After a year of mounting unrest, Tunisia's rival political parties finally reached an accord to dissolve the Islamist-led government and create a caretaker administration. Despite deep polarization, the Islamists agreed to give up power, keeping the country's democratic transition on course.

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