Postscripts

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Postscript,
Ananda Rose

Crossing the border between the United States and Mexico is more dangerous than ever. Here's what happens to those who make it -- and those who don't.

Postscript,
R. Daniel Kelemen

Last Friday, EU leaders voted to nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as the next president of the European Commission. Juncker’s nomination constituted a major victory for the European Parliament and a humiliating defeat for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Postscript,
Emma Sky

The United States has a key role to play in helping broker a new deal among Iraqi elites that creates a better balance among the country's various communities.

Postscript,
John Mueller

American foreign policy, routinely decorated with extravagant alarmism over the last dozen years or so, has been an abject failure. That is why it is a good thing that threat-inflation is becoming a harder sell when it comes to Iraq.

Postscript,
Reidar Visser

With the situation in Mosul rapidly deteriorating, Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki seems to be considering two main alternatives: proceed with forming a new cabinet, which would require him to include at least some of his political enemies, or consolidate his influence among Iraqi Shia, with little regard for what happens to the Sunni and Kurdish parts of the country.

Postscript,
Duncan McCargo

The celebratory mood in some corners of Thailand that followed Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's ouster is likely to prove short-lived. Her removal will only usher in an illegitimate regime that exacerbates tensions in the country and lays the groundwork for future protests.

Postscript,
Keith Darden

For the first time since 1989, Europe is transforming. The primary protagonists, by most accounts, are Russia and the West. The bit of territory that they are clawing at -- Ukraine -- has largely been eclipsed. Yet inattention to Ukraine’s internal demons reflects a dangerous misreading of current events.

Postscript,
Isobel Coleman

In the run up to this spring's parliamentary elections, Iraqis are debating a new personal status law. Supporters claim that the law will give Shia more freedom to practice their religion. Opponents argue that it would promote sectarianism and seriously undermine the rights of women and children by permitting unfettered polygamy, a Taliban-like restriction on women’s movement, child marriage for girls as young as nine, unequal divorce and custody, and an end to interreligious marriage.

Postscript,
Alexander J. Motyl

To deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin, the West has to assume that he is rational and will respond to carrots and sticks. Accordingly, it should take him up on his proposal to form a working group on Ukraine, which would at least force everyone to take a deep breath and survey the situation with a measure of calm.

Postscript,
Brenda Shaffer

Officials have proposed speeding up U.S. natural gas exports to Europe to help shield the continent from the Ukraine crisis, which could disrupt Russian gas deliveries to the region. But Ukraine is not Europe's biggest problem. More troubling are its unhelpful energy policies and insufficient pipeline system, which prevent it from using the extra gas it already has.

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