Snapshots

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Snapshot,
Snapshot,
Matthew Johnson

The United Kingdom is set to go to the polls to select among a wider variety of parties than ever before. At stake in this election is more than control of Westmister. Indeed, it is the concept of British identity as a whole.

Snapshot,
Steven A. Cook

For Gallipoli’s Turkish defenders, the battle there was an important victory in defense of the Ottoman Empire. Paradoxically, it also became a touchstone of the nationalism that was so important to the establishment of the Republic of Turkey less than a decade later. Likewise, celebrations planned for the battle’s centenary reflect the tension between the valorization of the Ottoman era and the hallowed memory of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

Snapshot,
John Lee

Tiny Djibouti in the Horn of Africa is a key strategic outpost for U.S. armed forces. But with China getting in on the act, Washington would do well to pay more attention to the country—or risk losing its foothold there.

Snapshot,
Benjamin Brake

In the wake of the Snowden revelations, it has become more difficult for governments to conduct surveillance operations. As a result, black and gray markets for anti-encryption software have boomed.

Snapshot,
Denise Natali

Within Iraq and Syria, the U.S.-led campaign against ISIS relies heavily on Kurdish Peshmerga. But the Peshmerga haven’t been a total success story; Peshmerga forces are using coalition air strikes to engineer territorial and demographic changes that are antagonizing Sunni Arabs—the very communities the United States needs on its side to degrade ISIS.

Snapshot,
Adam Mount

On Monday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will travel to New York to convince the world that the United States is working toward a world free of nuclear weapons. He has a stronger case than you might think.

Snapshot,
Catherine Thomas and Johannes Haushofer

Mental health is not just a First World problem. In the developing world, depression is often a cause, not a result, of poverty.

Snapshot,
Mohsen Milani

Saudi Arabia is grossly exaggerating Iran’s power in Yemen to justify its own expansionist ambitions. Iran is not the cause of the civil war, nor are the Houthis its proxy. Chaos, not Iran, controls the Arab world's poorest nation.

Snapshot,
Charles Schmitz

Many suspect former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh of using the Houthis, his old enemies, to try to regain power. But in the end, he may end up as the conflict's biggest loser.

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