Snapshots

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Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

In assembling an international coalition to combat ISIS, the United States has looked mostly to the Middle East and Europe, regions that it said face a direct threat from the militant Islamist group. But other parts of the world are just as anxious about ISIS -- above all, Southeast Asia.

Snapshot,
Charles King

The United Kingdom has been saved -- for now. But last week's referendum marks the beginning, not the end, of a debate on the United Kingdom's constitutional order, its party system, its territorial configuration, and its relationship with Europe.

Snapshot,
Bo Rothstein

The days of Swedish exceptionalism are over. The country no longer has an exceptionally strong social democracy. Its level of inequality is no longer exceptionally low, and its level of public spending will no longer be exceptionally high. From now on, it will be closer to average.

Snapshot,
Jim Krane

The Persian Gulf's state-owned airlines are already major global brands associated with hospitality, convenience, and safety. And even as conflicts rage nearby, they're still ascending. Their arrival has been to the airline business -- and could be to regional politics -- what the dreadnought battleship was to naval supremacy: a game changer.

Snapshot,
James Yan

Few countries in Asia are in a more precarious foreign policy position than the Republic of Azerbaijan. On the western shore of the Caspian Sea, Azerbaijan lies between two larger, stronger, and unfriendly countries -- Iran and Russia -- and Azerbaijan’s pro-Western bent has done little to endear the country to either neighbor.

Snapshot,
Yascha Mounk

Europe’s political climate is more hostile to Jews now than at any time in recent memory. Rising anti-Semitism among Europe’s Muslims, especially in the wake of the war in Gaza, is one reason for this change. But to claim that the rise of Muslim anti-Semitism is the main culprit -- as the German journalist Jochen Bittner did this week in The New York Times -- is to overlook the role played by the European majority.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

In recent years, Occupy Wall Street hasn’t been the only group worried about how the spoils of economic growth have been distributed. Governments worldwide increasingly share the sentiment: like the pinched middle classes, they feel that corporations are taking too much of the profits for themselves. Here's the OECD and G-20's plan to get them to pay more.

Snapshot,
Fahad Nazer

The U.S.-Saudi relationship has suffered in recent years, with both sides harboring grievances about the other. But the fight against ISIS promises a return to better days.

Snapshot,
Kim Yi Dionne

Fear of the Ebola virus and an out-of-control epidemic have made it easier for governments around the world to focus on security and military responses to public health solutions. Here's why that is a bad thing.

Snapshot,
Robin Simcox

There are still those in the West who regard using military force against ISIS as a mistake, believing that, with the beheadings of Western journalists, ISIS was hoping to provoke a showdown with the United States all along. Nothing could be further from the truth.

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