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Don't Mistake Russia for Iran

Why the Same Sanctions Strategy Won't Work

Eric Lorber and Elizabeth Rosenberg
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a military parade in Belgrade, October 16, 2014.
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a military parade in Belgrade, October 16, 2014. (Marko Djurica / Courtesy Reuters)
U.S. policymakers are considering giving global companies a choice: stop providing long-term financing and energy assistance to major Russian companies or be kicked out of the U.S. financial system. Such measures resemble the sanctions the United States placed on Iran a couple of years ago. But Iran was a different problem. And treating Russia the same way would be a mistake.
Interview

The Mission for Manila

Benigno Aquino III
The president of the Philippines talks to Foreign Affairs about economic reform, political corruption, and Chinese aggression.
Interview

Opening Indonesia

Joko Widodo
Indonesia’s new president talks to Foreign Affairs about his recent victory, his national agenda, and the threat of Islamic extremism.
Capsule Review

Today's Book: Liberalism

G. John Ikenberry
Fawcett traces the liberal tradition from its origins in nineteenth-century Europe, to its historic union with democracy early in the twentieth century, to its near-fatal collapse after World War I and the Great Depression, and culminating in its triumph and spread in the decades after World War II.