September/October 2009

September/October 2009
88, 5

Essays

Essay
Zbigniew Brzezinski

In the course of its 60 years, NATO has united the West, secured Europe, and ended the Cold War. What next?

Essay
Josef Joffe

Since the United States first became a global superpower, it has been fashionable to speak of its decline. But in today's world, the United States' economic and military strength, along with the attractiveness of its ideals, will ensure its power for a long time to come.

Essay
Edward L. Morse

Despite common assumptions, oil prices are likely to remain low for a while: key producers, especially Saudi Arabia, have been boosting their production, and demand growth in top consumers like the United States and China will be more modest than expected.

Essay
Barry Eichengreen

The economic crisis is hurting the world's top currency. But the pound, the yen, the euro, the renminbi, and the IMF's accounting currency are no match for the dollar. At least for now.

Essay
Patrice C. McMahon and Jon Western

Bosnia was once a poster child for successful postwar reconstruction; today, it is on the verge of collapse. The 1995 Dayton accord ended a war, but it also created a fractured polity ripe for exploitation by ethnic chauvinists. 

Essay
Deepak Malhotra

In deciding whether to impose preconditions before negotiating with an enemy, governments should make sure two criteria are satisfied: that the opponent is capable of meeting the demands and that its doing so will not weaken its future leverage.

Essay
Michael Levi

The Copenhagen conference won't solve the problem of climate change once and for all. Rather than aiming for a broad international treaty, negotiators should strengthen existing national policies and seek targeted emissions cuts in both rich nations and the developing world.

Essay
Jessica Seddon Wallack and Veerabhadran Ramanathan

Most initiatives to slow global warming involve reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Little attention has been given to reducing emissions of the light-absorbing particles known as "black carbon" or the gases that form ozone--even though doing so would be easier and cheaper and have a more immediate effect.

Essay
Joel Kurtzman

The free market has eliminated environmental hazards in the past, from leaded gas to acid rain, and it can solve the problem of climate change today. A cap-and-trade system offers the best hope for reducing pollution and encouraging green growth.

September/October 2009

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Reviews & Responses

Review Essay
Charles Tripp

The notion of political Islam may be a more complicated bargain than many realize, and Muslims who seek to shape the world according to their religious values often confront an obdurate reality.

Review Essay
Stephen Kotkin

The Chinese-Russian relationship is more opportunistic than strategic, Bobo Lo argues. The United States is stuck watching from the sidelines and may be pushing Moscow further into Beijing's pocket.

Review Essay
Timothy Samuel Shah

Religion and modernity were never expected to go hand in hand, and for centuries they coexisted uncomfortably. But thanks to the entrepreneurial model of American evangelicals, argue two journalists at The Economist, God is back.

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