January/February 2015

January/February 2015
94, 1

Comments

Comment
Gideon Rose

Entrepreneurs drive innovation and dynamism, which in turn drive growth. So our lead package explores entrepreneurialism today—what it involves, what it accomplishes, and what can be done to spur and profit from it.

Comment
Robert Litan

Over the past 30 years, the rate of start-up formation in the United States has slowed down. To reclaim its status as a hub of innovation, the United States must tackle reforms in many areas, from immigration and business regulation to health care and education.

Comment
James Bessen

Multibillion-dollar valuations in Silicon Valley have obscured underlying problems in the way the United States develops technology. Government policies increasingly favor powerful interest groups over promising start-ups, stifling technological innovation.

Comment
Mariana Mazzucato

Conventional wisdom says the state can best foster innovation by just getting out of the way. In fact, government has historically served not as a meddler in the private sector but as a key booster of it—and often a daring one, willing to take risks that businesses won’t.

Comment
Bryan C. Mezue, Clayton M. Christensen, and Derek van Bever

To create broad-based and sustainable economic growth, governments in the developing world should foster market-creating innovation—that is, the generation of new products and services that reach an entirely new population of customers.

Essays

Essay
Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Gregory F. Treverton

Instead of trying to predict "Black Swan" events such as coups or crises, forecasters should look at how political systems handle disorder. The best indicator of a country’s future trajectory is not a lengthy past stability but recent moderate volatility.

Essay
Matthias Matthijs and R. Daniel Kelemen

Despite all the grim predictions, the European Union is not on the verge of collapse. Quite the contrary: if European leaders act with resolve and persistence, the union could experience a rebirth.

Essay
Hans Kundnani

The Ukraine crisis has reopened old questions about Germany’s relationship to the rest of the West, as Germany drifts away from the United States and gravitates toward Russia and China.

Essay
Robert Martinage

Ninety-five percent of intercontinental communications traffic travels not by air or through space but by undersea cable. The United States, however, is failing to protect this critical infrastructure. Here’s how Washington must change course.

Essay
Thomas R. Insel, Pamela Y. Collins, and Steven E. Hyman

Far from being a "First World problem," mental illness is a global scourge that affects people of all incomes and backgrounds. By 2030, mental disorders will cost the global economy around $6 trillion a year—more than heart disease.

Essay
Thomas de Waal

A century on, discussions about the Ottoman massacre of Armenians are still dominated by questions surrounding the use of one fraught and divisive word: “Genocide.” Washington should use the term but also recognize its many limitations.

January/February 2015

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Interview

Interview
Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, talks to Foreign Affairs about American competitiveness, creative disruption, and why he runs into the office every morning.

Interview
Marcelo Claure

Marcelo Claure, founder of BrightStar and CEO of Sprint, talks to Foreign Affairs about how to run a corporation like an entrepreneur and bringing soccer to the United States. 

Interview
Helen Greiner

Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot and founder of CyPhy Works, talks to Foreign Affairs about robots, Star Wars, and how to bring futuristic technology to market. 

Interview
Mo Ibrahim

Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel, talks to Foreign Affairs about succeeding in the mobile sector, innovating in the developing world, and the future of governance in Africa.

Interview
Michael Moritz

Venture capitalist Michael Moritz talks to Foreign Affairs about predicting success, investing globally, and why Google’s original business model was a failure.

Interview
Niklas Zennstrom

Niklas Zennstrom, founder of Skype, talks to Foreign Affairs about the sharing economy, why start-ups are thriving in Europe, and how technology can address climate change.

Reviews & Responses

Review Essay
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

Review Essay
Sarah E. Mendelson

The Russian millennials who will inherit Vladimir Putin’s political system won’t upend it. Drawing on hours of conversations with Russia’s future leaders, Ellen Mickewicz explains why they will uphold the status quo.

Review Essay
Iain Hampsher-Monk

The eighteenth-century British politician and writer Edmund Burke is often called the father of modern conservatism. A new intellectual biography of Burke shows why that label fails to capture the complexity of Burke's thought and legacy.

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