Regions

Africa

Postscript,
Matt Mossman

Nigeria’s election may have ended with a winner and a loser, but it was more about the process than the candidates. And there, great gains were made.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Roughly $1.3 billion in remittances flow to Somalia every year. But heavy-handed regulation threatens to cut off this vital flow of money.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Zimmerman

Since the 1960s, Americans have split into two camps on sex education: one side wants to teach kids how to make choices about sex, and the other wants to teach them to avoid it. That’s not an issue in most parts of the developing world, where the idea of youth as sexual decision-makers is simply anathema.

Americas

Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

Rousseff seems likely to remain in office—but one might reasonably wonder why anyone would want to want to be at the helm in Brazil for what will be a number of bumpy years.

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Response,
Jonathan Schlefer

In my article, I tried to dissect how the Mexican state can be so successful in some dimensions and so troubled in others, with an aim toward suggesting a way to a better future. That, rather than nit picking, should be the pursuit of all observers of Mexico.

Asia

Snapshot,
Jonah Blank

After years of broken promises, there is reason to believe that the pronouncements about a better U.S.–Afghan future deserve the benefit of the doubt.

Snapshot,
Fritz Schumann

Urban migration has been particularly unkind to the small town of Nagoro, population 35. One woman fights the emptiness by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.

Snapshot,
Sumit Ganguly

Despite Modi’s best efforts, domestic developments in India threaten to jeopardize his foreign policy initiatives. He courts foreign leaders with grace, projecting professional cosmopolitanism, but his government has encouraged a dangerous, parochial social agenda at home.

Europe

Snapshot,
David Gordon and Thomas Wright

Greece's new leaders have effectively united Europe against them. To repair the damage and keep the country's economy afloat, they need to rethink their message and adjust their demands.

Snapshot,
Paolo Spada and Hollie Russon Gilman

At a time of record low trust in public institutions, thousands of new channels for citizen involvement in government are opening across the world. They go further than electoral participation; they increase citizens’ ability to monitor, regulate, and, in some cases, directly affect political decision-making.

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay and Marc Sievers

The chaos in the Middle East has tested many relationships, not least the one between Egypt and Turkey. In the immediate term, it seems likely that the two countries' rivalry will exacerbate the Libyan civil war. Further out, even worse could be in store.

Middle East

Snapshot,
Timothy William Waters

For the Palestinian Authority, joining the International Criminal Court is part of a larger effort to internationalize its dispute with Israel. The trend promises plenty of turmoil and trouble in the months and years ahead—for the ICC, for Israel, and for Palestine itself.

Snapshot,
Mohammad Ali Shabani

In a YouTube address last November, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif dropped Tehran’s usual mantra about Iran’s right to enrich and spoke instead of negotiating with dignity. The video went viral in Iran, and the sentiment behind it seems to be paying off in Geneva.

Snapshot,
Amos Yadlin and Avner Golov

Israel and the United States share the same strategic goal: preventing Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. The intelligence services of both countries are also largely in agreement on the status of the Iranian program. But they remain deeply divided on what to do about it. Here's how to bring them together.

Russia & FSU

Snapshot,
Alisher Ilkhamov and Jeff Goldstein

Uzbekistani President Islam Karimov may have won yet another fraudulent election, but challenges to his rule abound.

Snapshot,
Marlene Laruelle

Washington's latest sanctions have missed the mark. Targeting an ideologue such as Alexander Dugin will do little to punish Russia for its crimes against Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Gregory Feifer

Last December, an emotional defense of the Kremlin’s war in Ukraine began swirling around the Internet. Amid the volleys of opinion about Moscow’s actions, the provenance of this particular open letter stood out: its authors were descendants of some of the most powerful Russian aristocratic families that fled the country after the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917.

Global Commons

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Christopher Tunnard, and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi

Estonia is the gold standard when it comes to digital innovation. The question is: How does the rest of the world catch up?

Snapshot,
Amrita Narlikar

Developed and developing countries use poverty as a bargaining tool. Here's how.

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.