Central Africa

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Snapshot,
Martin Welz and Angela Meyer

The history of the Central African Republic over the past 20 years is linked to a dizzying number of peacekeeping acronyms. The latest mission, to be led by the UN, seems fated to repeat mistakes of its predecessors.

Comment, 2014
Stephen R. Weissman

Newly available evidence shows that the CIA engaged in pervasive political meddling and paramilitary action in Congo during the 1960s -- and that the local CIA station chief directly influenced the events that led to the death of Patrice Lumumba, the country's first democratically elected prime minister.

Snapshot,
Ricardo Soares De Oliveira

The countries of East Africa are in the early throes of an oil boom, with an unprecedented opportunity for economic development. Unless they avoid the mistakes of those before them, though, the region's governments could easily squander it.

Interview, May/June 2014
Paul Kagame

Rwanda's president speaks with Foreign Affairs about the 1994 genocide, his 11-year stint in office, and his country's political future.

Essay, May/June 2014
Swanee Hunt

It would be obscene to say that the genocide in Rwanda had even the thinnest silver lining. But it did create a natural -- or unnatural -- experiment, as the country’s social, economic, and political institutions were wiped out. In important respects, the reconstructed Rwanda is a dramatically different country, especially for women.

Snapshot,
John Prendergast

Africa's bloodiest conflicts are not new, but they have never been more linked than they are today. Traditional peacemaking efforts have largely failed to grapple with that reality.

Snapshot,
Jason Stearns

At the end of October, the Congolese government finally defeated a serious armed rebellion. Congo owes its victory to its more capable army — and Rwanda's decision to end its involvement.

Essay, Sept/Oct 2013
Jason Stearns

The devastating conflict in Congo continues not just because of failures on the part of the Congolese and Rwandan governments but also because outside powers have bungled their response. They have focused on supporting the Congolese government when they should be using their aid as leverage to get officials in Kinshasa and Kigali to stop resorting to politically motivated violence.

Essay, May/June 2013
Shantayanan Devarajan and Wolfgang Fengler

Sub-Saharan Africa’s GDP has grown five percent a year since 2000 and is expected to grow even faster in the future. Although pessimists are quick to point out that this growth has followed increases in commodities prices, the success of recent political reforms and the increased openness of African societies give the region a good chance of sustaining its boom for years to come.

Snapshot,
Gerhard Seibert

Citizens of São Tomé and Príncipe have been waiting for their territorial waters to yield oil for over a decade. Today, there are high hopes that the country will finally become an energy producer in the next few years. But expectations are likely to be disappointed once again.

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