East Africa

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Snapshot,
John Lee

Tiny Djibouti in the Horn of Africa is a key strategic outpost for U.S. armed forces. But with China getting in on the act, Washington would do well to pay more attention to the country—or risk losing its foothold there.

Snapshot,
Paul Hidalgo

Al Shabab has been pushed out of its strongholds and cut off from its financial lifelines. And that is why the group’s ability to so easily attack within Kenya is so puzzling. Kenyan leaders have long blamed Somalia-based fighters and the country’s minority Muslim population. But the truth is that the main culprits are the culture and policies of the government itself.

Snapshot,
Harry Verhoeven

Ethiopia has surpassed Egypt as the most powerful country on the Nile. And African and Arab states alike are fast recognizing that they should build friendly ties with Addis Ababa now—or else face an even stronger competitor five years from now.

Snapshot,
Joshua Meservey

Al Shabab was once one of the premier terror groups in the world. Years before ISIS gobbled up sections of Syria and Iraq, al Shabab conquered and then governed most of southern Somalia. But the group has been in decline since its apex in 2010, and it is now fighting back through gruesome attacks in Kenya.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Joshua Meservey

Nairobi's use of extreme measures to fight terrorism is undermining its fledgling democracy.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

To take out al Shabab, one need look no further than charcoal. The United Nations has repeatedly called for countries in the region to disrupt the group’s trade in this environmentally destructive product, but, as the most recent Somalia UN Monitoring Group report revealed, such efforts have been lackluster. With its patience wearing thin, the UN has now taken matters into its own hands by approving a naval intervention.

Snapshot,
Paul Hidalgo

Last week’s deadly U.S. strike on Ahmed Abdi Godane, the leader of the Somalia-based Islamist militant group al Shabab, could be the group’s undoing. Even so, the region is not out of the woods.

Letter From,
David P. Sandgren

Kenya’s first postcolonial middle class is now in its mid-60s, retiring and settling into comfortable grandparenthood. Few would have predicted this outcome, especially for the Gikuyu, Kenya’s largest ethnic group, since this generation’s early years were filled with poverty and violence.

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