West Africa

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Snapshot,
Kim Yi Dionne

Fear of the Ebola virus and an out-of-control epidemic have made it easier for governments around the world to focus on security and military responses to public health solutions. Here's why that is a bad thing.

Snapshot,
Seth Kaplan

Life in Nigeria's largest city is changing for the better, offering a potential lesson for struggling states looking to stage a turnaround: mayors and city councils are more likely to embrace positive change than legislatures and presidents -- and far more quickly and effectively.

Snapshot,
Isobel Coleman and Sigrid von Wendel

Boko Haram, whose name roughly translates to “secular education is a sin,” has been committing heinous attacks across Nigeria's north for years, frequently targeting schools. To fight back, Abuja must double down on education even as it rethinks its counterterrorism strategy.

Snapshot,
Jessica Hatcher

What’s particularly disturbing about the latest Ebola outbreak is that the United States has recently developed treatments for the disease. But, despite lobbying from scientists, the drugs have not been put to the test.

Snapshot,
Ricardo Soares De Oliveira

The countries of East Africa are in the early throes of an oil boom, with an unprecedented opportunity for economic development. Unless they avoid the mistakes of those before them, though, the region's governments could easily squander it.

Interview, Mar/Apr 2014
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

Nigeria's finance minister speaks with Foreign Affairs about the developing world's role in international financial institutions, the fight against corruption, and her mother's politically motivated kidnapping.

Letter From,
Andrew Lebovich

The shifting focus on Niger as a Western partner for counterterrorism should not blind the European Union, France, and the United States to the West African nation's governance and reform deficits. Internal militant unrest, trafficking and other criminal enterprises, and weak, corrupt rule all threaten Niger’s tenuous stability.

Snapshot,
Jean-Philippe Dedieu

Mali held a presidential runoff election this weekend. Here's why the vote of the country's diaspora will determine the next government's political legitimacy.

Interview, Sept/Oct 2013
Macky Sall

In this exclusive interview, Senegal's president speaks candidly about democracy, development, regional security, and Obama.

Snapshot,
Leonard S. Rubenstein

For the second time in less than six months, polio vaccine workers in Pakistan have come under fire. For the gunmen, killing health care workers has been seen as a legitimate response to a nefarious extension of Western power. And, for the CIA, faux vaccine campaigns have sometimes been justified as part of the war on terror. Both sides are wrong: denying or providing health care should never be an instrument of statecraft.

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